Survivalist News Network

What If…? 5 Unlikely Disasters & What You Should Know About Them

By Phillip Henderson

Statistically speaking, some events are rare or highly unlikely. (Thankfully!). But as any preppers worth their salt will tell you, there’s really no such thing as an impossible event. And science agrees – just check out David J. Hand’s The Improbability Principle: Why Coincidences, Miracles, and Rare Events Happen Every Day. It’s an article about how extremely improbable events actually happen all the time. Unfortunately, this also includes supposedly unlikely disasters.

These events shouldn’t be the focus of your preparedness. You should concentrate on things that have a greater chance of occuring. 

But while it’s fairly improbable that you’ll be a victim of one of these events, what if you were? And if you were, knowing a little bit about them could possibly help you survive in some of these scenarios. After all, isn’t expecting the unexpected what preppers do?

Nuclear Winter

Despite the currently tumultuous international political climate, modern wars and skirmishes tend to cover relatively small areas of the planet and are thus unlikely to result in nuclear warfare. At the same time, no one can really say whether or not it will ever happen, especially when we’re also engaged in problematic diplomatic relations with unstable, well-armed countries. (Iran, anyone?)

Another thing that needs to be considered is the fact that war isn’t the only path to a nuclear winter. A troubling report from The National Interest reveals that our country’s own nuclear weapons and facilities are not just old and outdated, but also very expensive to upgrade.  Any of these factors could lead to nuclear devastation in North America.

Popular Science magazine imagined a horrifying scenario in which 100 nuclear warheads the size of the bomb the US dropped on Hiroshima detonated over the Indian subcontinent in an India-Pakistan nuclear war:

  • Five megatons of black carbon enter the atmosphere immediately. Black carbon comes from burned stuff and it absorbs heat from the sun before it can reach the Earth. Some black carbon does eventually falls back to Earth in rain.
  • After one year, the average surface temperature of the Earth falls by 1.1 kelvin, or about two degrees Fahrenheit. After five years, the Earth is, on average, three degrees colder than it used to be. Twenty years on, our home planet warms again to about one degree cooler than the average before the nuclear war.
  • Earth’s falling temperatures reduces the amount of rain the planet receives. Year five after the war, Earth will have 9 percent less rain than usual. Year 26 after the war, Earth gets 4.5 percent less rain than before the war.
  • In years 2-6 after the war, the frost-free growing season for crops is shortened by 10 to 40 days, depending on the region.
  • Chemical reactions in the atmosphere eat away Earth’s ozone layer, which protects Earth’s inhabitants from ultraviolet radiation. In the five years after the war, the ozone is 20 to 25 percent thinner, on average. Ten years on, the ozone layer has recovered so that it’s now 8 percent thinner.
  • The decreased UV protection may lead to more sunburns and skin cancers in people, as well as reduced plant growth and destabilized DNA in crops such as corn.
  • In a separate study, published in 2013, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War estimated 2 billion people would starve in the wake of a 100-A-bomb war.

“The Big One”

The west coast of North America from northern California to Vancouver Island is what’s known as the Cascadia subduction zone. It’s where the floor of the Pacific Ocean is being pushed underneath the North American landmass. When the pressure finally gets released, it could result in The Big One, the continent-breaking quake that we all know is coming.

The biggest earthquake in the last 300 years of North American history would likely not just level buildings and take out utilities for an extended period of time, but could also cause a period of social and economic unrest. Survival would entail a combination of basic earthquake preparedness, hunting, and other outdoor skills, as well as a large stockpile to see you through until order was restored.

A Lightning Strike at Home

The BBC reports that the odds of being struck by lightning in the US are 700,000 to 1. But as we can attest to, it does happen, and sometimes, it can happen to your home – as one woman learned the hard way here at The Organic Prepper.

The best preventive defense would be to arm your home’s electrical system with the most powerful surge protectors you can get your hands on. They won’t protect everything from getting fried, but they can save some essential electrical equipment. In the unfortunate event that lightning does strike your home, have every nook and cranny of your building’s wiring checked for any damage. It’s the gift that keeps on giving, and you may find damage weeks or even months down the line. It pays to hold off on submitting that insurance claim right away.

A Plane Crash

Thankfully, statistics from Lottoland state that your odds of being in a plane crash are 1.2 million to 1. In fact, 2017 was both the busiest as well as the safest year in commercial airline history, with more flights being made than ever before and zero passenger plane crashes anywhere in the world.

Of course, this doesn’t necessarily mean that plane crashes will never happen again.

Before you go on any flight, review basic airline safety guidelines. Don’t ignore the on-flight 

safety instructions and give them a double check to make sure that you completely understand them. Bring extra clothes in your hand luggage or carry on a thick coat, just in case your summer vacation ends in a cold environment. 

Unfortunately, with the advent of the TSA, you can’t bring most of the survival tools you’d want to have if you found yourself in an episode of Lost. But, there are a few things that Daisy recommends bringing in your carry-on baggage that you can get past airport security without any trouble.

A Meteor Strike

Literally thousands of meteors careening at high speeds through space pass by without hitting Earth every year. The monitoring devices of NASA as well as other international space agencies can only do so much until one gets past their radars and hits us unexpectedly.

The results of a meteor strike are dependent on two things: where it strikes and how big the meteor is.

Since 71% of the earth is covered in water, the odds are high that the meteor would land there once it entered the earth’s atmosphere. We’re not out of the woods if this happens, because it could result in a catastrophic tsunami, although it isn’t the most likely consequence. This video shows what would happen if a meteor landed in the middle of the ocean:

If it were to strike land, it would be nothing less than disastrous.

The 2013 impact in Chelyabinsk, Russia, was the most destructive such strike in modern times. It may have only been about ten meters across, but its impact in an urban area caused millions of dollars worth of property damage and resulted in more than 1,500 documented injuries. A century earlier, the Tunguska event leveled over a thousand square kilometers of forest, exploding with an energy of between 5 and 10 MegaTons of TNT: similar to an atomic bomb. (source)

The second concern is the size of the meteor. A meteor of only 100 meters – not quite the length of a football field – could be utterly catastrophic.

The first thing that happens would be the fireball from the initial strike, which would span nearly four kilometers in diameter for an asteroid only 100 meters in size. (And that’s its size in space, not when it reaches the ground!) Next is the catastrophic effects of radiation: thermal, not nuclear. This won’t poison you, but will simply cook you, albeit more slowly than the fireball does, covering nearly double the area of the fireball. Buildings will be immediately leveled by the blast far beyond that, while extending more than twice as far out, structures will need to be demolished due to structural damage. And finally, extending out for approximately 40 kilometers in diameter, every human being will experience burns on their skin simply due to the heat emitted. All told, more than 2.5 million people would die if such an asteroid struck midtown Manhattan. (source)

This article has some simulations for other cities if they were hit by a meteor.

If a meteor 60 miles wide were to strike, it would exterminate all life on earth, regardless of where it hit.

Always Expect the Unexpected

Expecting the unexpected is at the heart of being a true prepper. While we may not be able to prevent certain “unlikely” disasters from happening, we can prepare by understanding these events.


OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

Metallic Cartridge Reloading In The Prepper Tool Kit

By Matt W.

Being a “doer” like most preppers I have always been fascinated with the idea of loading my own ammo. Perhaps caught up in the advertising that shows a rugged individual working a re-loader in a nice wood-paneled room full of hunting gear and trophies, wearing a plaid flannel shirt, a steaming cup of coffee (or hot chocolate) on the bench, with trees in autumn colors outside the window, and of course, his favorite hunting dog laying at his feet in anticipation of time in the field filling his head. 

The cold hard fact from my point of view is that I did not do enough shooting to really justify the initial investment. I once actually had the whole deal in a shopping cart at a favorite supply store. I love hunting upland birds and shooting skeet and trap, but life has gotten in the way of that almost daily. Am I the only one who realizes the more time-saving gadgets I have the less time I have to take advantage of them? So I returned everything to its rightful place back on the shelf. I was looking at $900 and couldn’t justify it not having shot that much commercial ammunition in the preceding 18 months. Of course I would be ahead now, 6 years later, but just barely. And now, looking at favorite pistol and rifle calibers, I see some sense in it as I once had a 264 Winchester Magnum that was a GREAT varmint rifle but commercial ammo was expensive, still is. Traded it away when $$$ was tight. Don’t know that I would have shot it enough to recoup the investment but I would love to have that rifle back. The clarity of hindsight.

In any case I would love to hear what other preppers think on the subject. Wild Bill


With the interest in the preparedness lifestyle growing at an explosive rate, one important skill is often brushed aside: reloading ammunition. Often, persons embarking on their own personal prepping journey will procrastinate on learning to reload their own ammunition. The reasons to put off learning to reload are understandable. Often, many people would rather just buy more firearms and more ammunition than put the time and money into learning reloading. People usually are put off by the expense of reloading equipment, feel that they do not have the time to learn reloading, or they do not have a person available to teach them.

Learning about all the reloading equipment and techniques can seem daunting at first but the skill is worth the effort. The initial investment in equipment and supplies for reloading can cost as little as about $300 or as much as one is willing to spend. However, there are many benefits to making the investment. First, a person can save a lot of money reloading, quickly recouping the startup costs. Second, by reloading ammunition a person can get much improved accuracy over using only factory ammunition. Third, for many rifle and pistol calibers a hand-loader will have many more choices available than solely relying on factory offerings, the combinations of components are near infinite. Fourth, reloading will allow a person to have ample supply of hard to find ammunition for a favorite pet caliber, unusual and rare cartridge, or old hunting rifle. Finally, when the next ammo shortage happens the reloader will be able to maintain his / her stockpile. As can be seen, there are many good reasons for preppers to take up reloading and each one will be looked in more detail.

Without a doubt, one of the most popular reasons that persons learn to reload ammunition is to save money. Ammunition is expensive and it is not getting any cheaper! However, anywhere from 65% to 80% of the cost of ammunition is in the cartridge case. Therefore, a person should always pick up their spent cartridge cases. That reusable brass case ties up a bunch of money, too much money to just leave laying on the ground like garbage. For example: if a box of rifle ammunition cost around $20 then about $15 of that is likely tied up in just the cartridge cases. No one would walk by $15 laying on the ground and not pick it up but people will leave perfectly good cartridge cases laying all over the range. A person could reload that box of ammo for $5 or less. That savings adds up fast and recoups the initial investment in equipment. The amount of money saved can be used to buy more ammo, more guns, optics, range time, training, prepping supplies, and on and on. If shooting those big safari rifles is appealing, the savings to the reloader are truly amazing. Some big game rifles cost the shooter anywhere from $5 to over $25 every time the trigger is pulled. This cost can prevent any frequent or meaningful target practice, often even impairing properly sighting in the weapon or zeroing a scope. Reloading can make shooting these big guns affordable and fun. As mentioned earlier, cost savings is a major motivator for reloaders. As a person living the preparedness lifestyle, allocating money and resources properly to maintain a regular life while preparing for the worst events is an ongoing process. Reloading is a good way to help preppers cut cost and spare resources.

Obtaining greater accuracy is another good reason to learn reloading. Many people who start reloading just to save money quickly discover this benefit. The quest for peak accuracy is what gets many people really fired up about reloading. Once a person experiences how easy it is to increase accuracy for a given load, they are well on the way to a life time of reloading. Firearms are expensive. Many times, people have been very disappointed with a new firearms shot groups, assuming there is a problem with the expensive new weapon. After hand-loading some ammunition, they have discovered there is nothing wrong with the weapon and that factory available ammunition is causing this sub-par performance. For example: this is very typical for 45 Colt revolvers. Historically, there has been some variation in bore diameters of production revolvers in this caliber. For safety reasons, the major ammunition manufacturers will produce loaded ammo with bullets in the smallest produced bore diameter. In some guns, these too small bullets will not engage the rifling’s and just rattle down the barrel, flying erratically out the muzzle. Accuracy is unbelievably poor when this happens. An easy fix for a reloader is to determine the bore diameter and reload using bullets of the appropriate diameter. This method has been proven to turn poorly grouping guns into tack drivers. Sometimes, the problem with a firearms accuracy is not in the gun but in the ammunition. Loading one’s own ammunition can help correct that.

Reloading greatly improves consistency and uniformity in the loaded cartridges. Hand-loading can definitely help with increasing accuracy over the modest distances of handgun ranges but the most dramatic improvements can be gained over the longer ranges usually shot with rifles. Some factory ammunition is very good. However, hand-loads will give the best and most accurate results over factory loaded ammunition. Much of the accuracy potential in a batch of hand-loads comes from consistency gained through precise attention to detail. With factory ammunition, there can easily be a 5% to 10% variation in muzzle velocity from shot to shot. A careful hand-loader can greatly reduce that variation in muzzle velocity, which will give a more consistent point of impact. Reloaders can also adjust the overall length of the loaded cartridge by adjusting bullet seating depth to better match the specific weapon they are using. This will improve accuracy by reducing bullet jump (distance a bullet travels before engaging the rifling) and more closely aligning the bullet center with the bore axis when the rifling is engaged, resulting in a better spin and truer flight. A careful reloader can more precisely align the bullet into the case, keeping the center of the bullet more closely on the axis of the weapon’s bore. The reloader is in control of every variable of the cartridge. The case lengths can be trimmed to exact specifications. Case mouths and crimping can be uniformed. Any possible variable can be minimized or eliminated to produce the most consistent ammunition, which all leads to better shot groups. Competitive shooters have long known that hand-loading is the way to get out the most accuracy from their weapons.

 

If a person is not shooting one of the more popular calibers, they may be disappointed with choices in factory available ammunition. Some of the lesser known, newly introduced, or very old calibers will not have enough choices of bullet styles and weights available in factory production ammunition. Some very capable cartridges are no longer offered in newly manufactured ammunition. A reloader will still have the ability to produce ammunition for these discontinued calibers. Dies and cartridge cases can still be purchased for calibers that have been discontinued long ago. Handloading or reloading ammunition is a way to get around these limitations.

The combinations of components are limitless. Bullet weights and shapes can be chosen specifically for maximum efficiency for any given purpose. Different bullet tip shapes, ogives, and base configurations can be chosen to fit a rifle or load for greater accuracy, consistency, or function. A person can load expanding bullets into cartridges for old surplus rifles that are generally only available in full metal jacket configuration, turning that old surplus rifle into a viable hunting weapon. Different propellants will burn with different rates and characteristics. This will affect muzzle velocity, consistency, and accuracy. With so many possible combinations of bullets, propellants, primers, and cases, a person can tailor a specific load for any purpose. If the goal is to get maximum efficiency, maximum utility, maximum accuracy, or effectiveness over a wide range of shooting distances, reloaders can tailor ammunition to any purpose. The sky’s the limit on possible loadings.

Money lying on the ground?

One very important thing to anyone living the preparedness lifestyle is securing and maintaining an ammunition supply. In recent years in the United States, we have experienced several ammunition shortages of varying degrees and durations. Everyone knows that is not a question of whether or not there will be another ammunition supply interruption but when the next big one is coming. The author remembers a time when he would give no consideration to leaving the house with a firearm without any ammo thinking “I’ll just pick up some on the way to the shooting range.” It is getting better but not quite back to those days yet. Certainly, anyone reading this article has not so distant memories of going to wally-world and seeing the ammo shelves empty. During the last ammo shortage, reloading components were still available for a time after all the ammo was off the shelves, allowing reloaders to stock up on components before the supply temporarily dried up. Reloading components are easy to stock up on. For example: at the time of writing this article Unique and Power Pistol powders were about $20 a pound. A person could load up around 1,150 rounds of 9mm ammo with one pound of these powders! Store a few pounds of powder and a person is set up to last through the ammo drought. Another way for a reloader to cut cost and extend his or her ammo supply is to cast lead bullets. After the initial cost of equipment, money saved by casting bullets will quickly recover the startup costs. Additionally, lead could be gathered from alternative sources instead of buying it. This will allow the resourceful prepper to make lead bullets at no cost. With some components in storage, the resourceful prepper can spend a little time in the evening reloading and replenishing his or her ammo supply when everyone else is scrounging for ammo or getting gouged by online price hikes.

So, it’s easy to see how reloading is another valuable tool in well-rounded preppers kit. Many people tend to feel rushed and overwhelmed when coming into the preparedness lifestyle. Along with marksmanship, martial arts, archery, fishing, hunting, farming, canning, tanning, mechanics, carpentry, communications, first aid, sewing, sanitation, and land navigation (just to get started) reloading seems like a ton to learn. However, persons reading this already have a great asset: motivation. If a person is willing and motivated to learn, there is a wealth of resources available.

Everyone is different and learns differently. For some people, it will be very difficult to pick up a reloading manual and start off reloading without any issues. For most people, the easiest and fastest way to learn is to have a someone actually show them step by step how to do it. Unfortunately, unless someone already knows a friend or family member who reloads it can be difficult to connect with someone willing to teach. No one wants to deal with that grumpy old condescending jerk at the local gun shop or put up with the know it all attitude from gun show arm chair rangers. This is why I’ve taken it upon myself to bring reloading to the preparedness community. I had no one to help me when I was learning reloading. It was frustrating. There is a whole new crowd of people who are either first time gun owners or have a general interest in firearms but feel isolated because they don’t have good resource people in their social circle. Often these persons are turned off to guns or discouraged because someone at a gun shop or gun show discouraged them or talked to them like they were stupid. That is why I am passionate about teaching others to reload. I offer completely free help, advice, and information in an encouraging, supportive, and nonjudgmental environment through email. Even though anyone could pick up good info from my emails, my emails are geared toward persons who have no or very little knowledge and / or experience with reloading. All you need is an inbox and a desire to learn. I’m not compensated for this service in any way by any one. This is just my way to give back to a great community. I send out emails regularly with reloading related content. 


OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

5 Signs That Global Financial Markets Are Entering A Bear Market, And 11 Ways That You Can Get Prepared For The Chaos That Is Coming

By Michael Snyder

We haven’t seen carnage like this in the global financial marketplace in quite some time. On Wednesday, U.S. stocks were down some, but things were much, much worse around the rest of the world. Global banking stocks are plunging, emerging market stocks are cratering, and emerging market currencies continue their stunning decline. This represents a dramatic change from the relative stability that we have seen throughout most of 2018. It is almost as if someone flipped a switch once the month of August began, and the shakiness of global financial markets has many investors wondering what trouble fall will bring. What we are witnessing right now is not a full-blown panic yet, but it definitely has the potential to turn into one.

The term “bear market” is being thrown around a lot lately, but a lot of people don’t understand what a “bear market” actually is.

A bear market is generally considered to be when we see a decline of 20 percent or more from the 52-week high, and after the carnage of this past week a lot of those thresholds are now being crossed.

It would probably be too early to call this a “global stock market crash”, but we are well on the way to getting there.  The following are 5 signs that global financial markets are entering a bear market…

#1 Global stocks have now fallen beneath all key moving averages. Those key moving averages are important psychological thresholds for investors, and if we have a few more days like Wednesday we could see global financial markets go into full panic mode.

#2 European banking stocks have now officially entered a bear market, and all major European stock indexes are now red for the year.

#3 Global banking stocks are down a whopping 23 percent from the peak established earlier this year, and that means that they have officially entered a bear market.

#4 Emerging market stocks have fallen 20 percent from the peak, and that means that they are also now in a bear market.

#5 When demand for industrial metals falls, that indicates that an economic slowdown is coming. On Wednesday, prices for industrial metals fell to their lowest level in almost a year, and “Dr. Copper officially entered a bear market.

If the financial carnage continues (and that is a big “if”), this could be the beginning of another financial crisis like we experienced in 2008, and that would almost certainly mean a crippling global recession.

And of course once the next global recession begins, it is likely to be more painful than we have ever seen before in modern history, because the global debt bubble is far larger than it has ever been before.

We live at a time of great global instability, and there are so many ominous warnings about our future. A lot of people reach out to me for advice on how to get prepared for what is coming, and I hope to share quite a few tips in future articles.

Today, I would like to share with you 11 tips that my good friend Ray Gano shared with his readers in his most recent article

—–

1 – Get Out of Debt: The old saying, “the borrower is the servant of the lender”, is so incredibly true. The key to insulating yourself from an economic meltdown is to become as independent as possible, and as long as you are in debt, you simply are not independent. You don’t want a horde of creditors chasing after you when things really start to get bad out there.

2 – Find New Sources of Income: With the birth of The IRA, there simply is no such thing as job security anymore. If you are dependent on a job (“just over broke”) for 100% of your income, you are in a very bad position.  There are thousands of different ways to make extra money. What you don’t want to do is to have all of your eggs in one basket. One day when the economy melts down and you are out of a job are you going to be destitute or are you going to be okay?

IF you need some ideas on what you can do, contact me and I can help.

3 – Reduce Your Expenses: Many Americans have left the rat race and have found ways to live on half or even on a quarter of what they were making previously. It is possible – if you are willing to reduce your expenses. In the future times are going to be tougher, so learn to start living with less today.

4 – Learn To Grow Your Own / Supplement Your Food: Today the vast majority of Americans are completely dependent on being able to run down to the supermarket or to the local Wal-Mart to buy food. But what happens when the U.S. dollar declines dramatically in value and it costs ten bucks to buy a loaf of bread? If you learn to grow your own food (even if is just a small garden) you will be insulating yourself against rising food prices. Another thing is to learn to hunt and fish. There is “low cost” food out there for the taking, you just need to assert yourself. (Low Cost = you still need to pay for hunting and fishing licenses.)

>>> CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT <<<

 

5 – Make Sure You Have A Reliable Water Supply: Water shortages are popping up all over the globe. Water is quickly becoming one of the “hottest” commodities out there. Even in the United States, water shortages have been making headline news recently. As we move into the future, it will be imperative for you and your family to have a reliable source of water. Some Americans have learned to collect rainwater and many others are using advanced technology such as atmospheric water generators to provide water for their families. But whatever you do, make sure that you are not caught without a decent source of water in the years ahead.

6 – Buy Land: This is a tough one, because prices are high depending on where you are looking. If you are able to buy land when prices are low, that is going to insulate you a great deal from the rising housing costs that will occur when the U.S dollar does totally go into the tank.

7 – Buy Precious Metals: this is a no brainer, but it still amazes me how many people are not doing this. Right now silver is sitting at $14.41. That is a very affordable price and a price that everyone can afford. We must start “paying ourselves first” and start pulling in these sort of assets.

The best place that I recommend is Renaissance Precious Metals. It is who I purchase from.

8 – Get Partially Off The Grid: An increasing number of Americans are going “off the grid”.  Essentially what that means is that they are attempting to operate independently of the utility companies. In particular, going “off the grid” will enable you to insulate yourself from the rapidly rising energy prices that we are going to see in the future. If you are able to produce energy for your own home, you won’t be freaking out like your neighbors are when electricity prices triple someday.

9 – Store Non-Perishable Supplies: Non-perishable supplies are one investment that is sure to go up in value.  Not that you would resell them. You store up non-perishable supplies because you are going to need them someday. So why not stock up on the things that you are going to need now before they double or triple in price in the future? Your money is not ever going to stretch any farther than it does right now.

EXAMPLE – Toilet Paper

10 – Develop Stronger Relationships: Americans have become very insular creatures. We act like we don’t need anyone or anything. But the truth is that as the we see a socio-economic melt down we are going to need each other. It is those that are developing strong relationships with family and friends right now that will be able to depend on them when times get hard.

11 – Get Educated And Stay Flexible: When times are stable, it is not that important to be informed because things pretty much stay the same. However, when things are rapidly changing it is imperative to get educated and to stay informed so that you will know what to do. The times ahead are going to require us all to be very flexible, and it is those who are willing to adapt that will do the best when things get tough.

—–


OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

Viral Video: North Carolina UFO Speculations Surge

By Mac Slavo

A viral video of a North Carolina UFO (unidentified flying object) over Lake Norman has speculations surging.  The video was shot in Mooresville as the cameraman was at work, and it appears to show the “spacecraft” hovering over the lake.

The exceptionally shaky video, posted by Jason Swing on May 29, was taken over Lake Norman in North Carolina. It’s difficult to tell what is in the video because there is no zooming in nor is the video even steady for very long. It has gone viral, however, having been viewed more than 250,000 times, as viewers scratch their heads trying to make sense of what they are seeing, reported Fox News. 

Watch the video below and see for yourself.

 

In the video’s description, Swing says that he was at work at 10:30 a.m. on a rainy day when he spotted the UFO hovering over the lake. “Rain finally stopped so we went [to] pick up a boat from Lake Norman,” Swing wrote. “When [I] came around the corner, I saw this thing sitting still, very close.”

Many viewers immediately chastized Swing’s videography skills too, commenting on the shakiness of the video.  “Next time you try and film a UFO, please try to jump around a little more. Also, adding a degree of blur would be a good touch. Geez.,” one viewer wrote.

“I’m videoing a UFO. But I’ve got something more important to do. Later,” another commenter wrote.

“Aliens always reveal themselves to people who shake uncontrollably and have no idea how to operate a zoom,” another commenter wrote. “Classic alien jerk move.”

Others were more forgiving as they viewed the cigar-shaped object. “Hello, this a great catch and I was hoping to show it on my channel with full credits and links back to yourself,” wrote one commenter known as The Hidden Underbelly 2.0. “Please let me know if this would be okay with yourself. Thanks and god bless.”

Some believed the sighting was nothing more than a Goodyear blimp, which was in the Charlotte area on May 29 for the NASCAR race.

Goodyear has since confirmed that it was indeed their blimp, though. “We don’t want to get in the way of a good story, but that’s definitely us,” the Goodyear Blimp account wrote, according to the Daily Mail. “We left the Charlotte area 5/29 after covering the Coke 600.”

 


OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

80% of Americans Living in Danger Zones

By Owen Sullivan

There are few things we take for granted more than our nation’s food supply.

Every single day, it ticks away in the background, unseen and unappreciated — a creaking behemoth of production and distribution.

Through these channels, millions of pounds of food are funneled silently to our supermarket shelves… only to be bought in a matters of days… and replaced so quickly you’d hardly notice they were gone in the first place.

But what if the supply suddenly stopped?

What if tomorrow morning, a city like Chicago — with a population of 2.7 million people — was cut off from all outside production?

How long would the food already in the city last?

The numbers don’t look good.

Sticking with supermarkets for a moment, the average store only keeps about three days’ worth of food on location at any one time.

This tight three-day window is just big enough to give stores ample supply to restock every night — but small enough to minimize storage and rotting.

However, this three-day estimation is 100% based on consumer activity during a regular shopping week. It doesn’t take into account how folks change their behavior in a crisis.

If there were a catastrophic event that stopped the production of food — be that an EMP that fried the national grid or an extreme global weather event that devastated our infrastructure — folks would know about it.

And the first thing they would do is stock up on as much food as they can.

The first day, there would be a frantic run on the stores. And between violent looting and legitimate sales, I doubt there would be anything left to sell on day two.

Now, depending on how much food you manage to grab… and how well you are able to ration… you might be able to make those supplies last for a couple of weeks.

But once that food is gone… there’s no more food coming… and there are 2.7 million people in the exact same boat as you.

Feeding the Beast

A city is a strange beast when you think about.

80% of all Americans live in danger zones, packed into high-rise buildings and cramped, narrow homes. We live on top of each under and under each other, trying to squeeze as many people into a few square miles as possible.

The idea is the more people in one place, the more opportunity. But the reality is… it leaves us all vulnerable.

Because “the beast” is so dense with people, it needs to consume an enormous amount of food… But with all the space taken up with offices and apartments blocks, there’s no room to actually produce any food.

So meat, produce, fish, and fast food are shipped in from the surrounding farmlands and factories across the country — and even imported from overseas.

But if you take away those supply lines… the beast starves… and it starves fast.

Experts estimate if our national grid were shut down — and the supply lines were severed — 90% of the entire country would die of starvation and disease in the first year.

Ninety percent of Americans dead in a single year. All because we’ve become too dependent on automation, machinery, and factories to feed our ballooning population.

Surviving in a Post-Collapse City

Trying to feed a city is a fool’s errand.

Ideally, everyone in city bounds would have a 90-day supply of food stockpiled to create a buffer of a few months to allow for lines of distribution to be re-established.

But you can’t expect other folks to be as well prepared as you are. And that makes a city one of the most dangerous places to be during a collapse.

Even if you have ample supplies and maybe even a method of producing your own food (more on that tomorrow), the vast majority of your 2.7 million neighbors do not. And in a post-collapse situation, they will do anything to get their hands on them.

At the end of the first week, things are going to start getting violent. And it’s only going to get worse from there. And I’m not just talking about roving gangs of violent youths here.

I’m talking about everyone. Starvation will make a perfectly normal person a heck of a lot more open to the idea of getting violent. They’ll do anything to survive and protect those they love. And they won’t care if that means hurting innocent people.

Living outside the city is a much more sensible option — especially if you can find a small town surrounded by farmland. That way you can’t be cut off from the food supply if the distribution channels go down.

If you have to live in the city because of work or relatives, I recommend being prepared to defend yourself and getting out of dodge at the first sign of trouble.

We’ll discuss this idea more tomorrow. And take a look at a single strategy for feeding your family and establishing strong financial footing in a post-collapse economy.

 


Do You Need Proof Of Weather Geoengineering?

By Catherine J. Frompovich

What’s with the weather where you are?  Everyone talks about the weather, but no one can control the weather!  Not so fast….there are numerous weather control or weather engineering patents.  Here is a wallpaper scroll listing most of them.

Recently, I heard a talking head on the local news radio station proclaim that humans have only 30 years left to be able to live on Planet Earth, as conditions for life are getting to be unsustainable.  The person making that remark was from a university.  Can we believe it or was that, like most science today, “consensus science”?

In the Saturday, August 11th, issue of Dane Wigington’s weekly report, he wrote this introduction: Our world is changing to a degree and at a rate that few yet understand. Wheels have been set in motion that can no longer be stopped. How will the masses react to what is unfolding? How long do we have until major links in the chain of our current reality begin to break?

As a concerned individual in many fields (research, journalism, health, the environment and human rights), I’d like to add my “two cents worth” to Dane’s in the hope it can bring some sensibility to those who still question weather geoengineering.

Recently, I had the opportunity to interact with a young man in his early twenties and we talked about those ‘contrails’ in the sky.  I took the opportunity to explain to him the difference between real contrails and weather engineering spraying some call “chemtrails.”

When I pointed out real contrails evaporate shortly behind jet engines, whereas those weather geoengineering lines can be seen as being sprayed and then periodically turned off for a period of time and restarted, as depicted in the two videos below.

 

When I explained to that young man if those ‘trails’ truly were vapor condensation, when the trails stopped the plane ought to fall out of the sky, since that means the jet engines were NOT working.  Duh!

Another thing I’d like to point out is the “soap suds” effect on streets and roadways during rains, something I never saw in my entire lifetime, except recently.  Is that a visible indication of the surfactants [1] being sprayed in weather geoengineering chemicals exercises?

I can remember the first time I saw the “soap suds.”  I thought the cars came from a car wash, but then remembered it was raining, so no car washes were open!  When one thinks rationally about what one sees, one has to doubt the propaganda and spin being disseminated by the mainstream, lamestream media about weather geoengineering!

(Source)

Other very real and visible aspects to illustrate the horrors of weather geoengineering are “tree stress” and “tree decline.”  Here’s what’s happening in California where weather geoengineering has caused a six-year-long weather anomaly, i.e., drought, and now firestorms.  Trees are Planet Earth’s lungs!

Tropical rainforests are often called the “lungs of the planet” because they generally draw in carbon dioxide and breathe out oxygen. But the amount of carbon dioxide they absorb, or produce, varies hugely with year-to-year variations in the climate.

 

Another weather anomaly attributed to weather geoengineering is ice-snow balls appearing on lakes.  I never remember any news agency in past years reporting such an unusual weather phenomenon.

However, it’s a global event as reported by NPR in their story “Giant Snowballs Wash Up On Siberian Beach.”

If you have lived at least 40 to 50 years, you ought to realize the things I’ve pointed out in this article were non-existent when you were younger, or you probably would remember hearing about them as weather news issues, since they really are unusual.  Don’t you think?  Now, look up to the sky and see something else you never saw before the last 20 years or so: weather management, weather geoengineering, Solar Radiation Management, etc.

 


Hijacked Airliner Outflies F15 in Suicide Spree

source: VT

Sputnik/Moscow: On Friday, an aircraft mechanic stole a Horizon Air passenger plane from Seattle’s international airport, performing a series of aerial stunts before crashing on a small island southwest of the city while being pursued by F-15s. In light of the dramatic but strange story, Sputnik has put together a list of similarly odd hijacking incidents.

Friday’s incident was well documented by video, which showed the dramatic pursuit, as well as footage from the crash site. According to the Seattle Times, the hijacking was “not a terrorist incident,” but a case involving a 29-year-old Pierce county resident and Horizon Air mechanic with “suicidal” intentions. The Bombardier Dash 8 Q400, with no one other than its hijacker pilot on board, crashed on Ketron Island, a sparsely populated island about 40 km southwest of Seattle. No other victims were reported.

Hijacking at the Dawn of the Aviation Age

Skyjackings started not long after commercial aviation itself began gaining acceptance. On September 25, 1932, in one of the earliest reported hijacking incidents in aviation history, a Panair do Brasil Sikorsky S-38 seaplane was hijacked by three men opposed to the Brazilian coup of 1930, who took a company employee hostage and managed to take off despite the fact that none of the men knew how to fly a plane. Following a short flight, the commandeered aircraft crashed in the city of Sao Joao de Meriti, killing everyone onboard.

© Wikipedia / Michael Sprague
Sikorsky S-38 at an airshow.

 

Skyjacking Where the Hijacker Became the Sole Survivor

On July 16, 1948, a Cathay Pacific Airways PBY Catalina flying boat was hijacked during a flight between Macau and Hong Kong, with the incident often described as the first-ever proper commercial skyjacking. The plane was taken over by a four-man gang, who planned to force it down in a remote location and hold its wealthy passengers hostage until a ransom was paid. However, as the hijack attempt began, Dale Cramer, the American pilot at the helm of the plane, refused to hand control over the plane to the would-be hijackers. Chiu Tok, the gang’s leader, shot Cramer, who fell onto the controls, sending the plane careening into the sea. Two nearby fishermen witnessed the incident and searched the plane for survivors, finding an unconscious man later identified as Wong Yu-man, one of the would-be hijackers. The criminal spent three years in prison for his crime. The other 25 passengers and the crew of the ill-fated flight were killed.

© Wikipedia / SkagitRiverQueen
Firefighting variant of the PBY Catalina, file photo.

 

Youngest-Ever Skyjacker Steals Plane and Goes Scot-Free

On November 10, 1969, 14-year-old Cincinnati resident David Booth skipped school and hijacked a Delta Airlines DC-9 on route to Chicago after airlines refused to cash a check he stole from his father and planned to use to buy a ticket to Boston to see his brother. Fearing severe punishment from his father, Booth pulled a knife on a young female passerby in the airport, dragging her to the plane, where he was engaged in an hour-and-a-half long standoff with the police. The standoff ended with Booth handing over the knife. Too young to be prosecuted, the teenager was sentenced to six months in a home for troubled teens. Forty years after the incident, Booth attempted to contact his hostage to apologize, only to find out that she died of cancer in 1996.

Thanksgiving Skyjacking of Legends

Between 1968 and 1972, in an era which would become known as a “golden age” of American skyjackings, over 130 planes were illegally commandeered over US airspace. The vast majority of these cases were resolved by authorities, with their perpetrators caught and imprisoned. However, the November 24, 1971, Thanksgiving skyjacking by a man identifying himself only as “D.B. Cooper” proved an exception and would go on to inspire nearly a dozen copycats. Cooper jacked a Northwest Orient Airlines Boeing 727-100 flying out of Portland to Seattle, passing the flight attendant a note saying he had a bomb in his briefcase and demanding $200,000, four parachutes, and a fuel truck. After touching down in Seattle, the hijacker released all the passengers and a flight attendant and continued on toward Reno. During the flight, Cooper opened a door toward the rear of the plane and jumped out. Although the FBI believes he was killed in a heavy rainstorm, his body was never found, and the case remains unsolved to this day.

© Wikipedia / FBI
DB Cooper’s Wanted poster

 

Dramatic Copycat ‘D.B. Cooper’-Style Skyjacking

On June 23, 1972, in a copycat crime modeled after the Cooper caper, Martin J. McNally hijacked an American Airlines Boeing 727 bound for Tulsa from St. Louis, demanding $502,500 in cash. Hearing live news reports about the hijacking, David J. Hanley, a 30-year-old businessman, drove his Cadillac into the airport and crashed into the 727’s nosegear, lodging his vehicle under the fuselage. Undeterred, McNally transferred to a second 727, took off, and jumped out of the plane over Indiana. The police later found his loot bag and gun, covered in McNally’s fingerprints, eventually leading to his arrest. On May 24, 1978, McNally, now imprisoned, and fellow inmate Garrett Trapnell, another would-be skyjacker who stuck up a plane in January 1972, attempted to break out of Illinois’ Marion Federal Prison using a stolen helicopter to be commandeered by Trapnell’s girlfriend. The attempt was foiled when the chopper’s pilot shot and killed the woman using her own gun.

© Wikipedia / Alain Rioux
An American Airlines Boeing 727, file photo.

 

Skyjacking for the Lord

On May 2, 1981, a 55-year-old Australian named Laurence James Downey hijacked an Aer 

Lingus Boeing 737 on route from Dublin to London by dousing himself in gasoline and heading to the cockpit with a cigarette lighter, threatening to set himself on fire anddemanding to be taken to Iran. After being told that the plane did not have enough fuel for the journey, Downey agreed to divert to Le Touquet, northern France, for refueling. During the layover, the hijacker demanded that Pope John Paul II release the so-called third secret of Fatima, a religious document shrouded in mystery, which the Vatican held off on publishing until the year 2000. While Downey was negotiating with authorities, French special forces stormed the aircraft and apprehended him. No one was injured in the incident. Downey was sentenced to five years in jail.

© Wikipedia / Eduard Marmet
An Aer Lingus Boeing 737 similar to the one hijacked by Downey.

 

Hijacker Surrenders Weapon in Exchange for More Beer

On June 21, 1985, Stein Arvid Huseby, a 24-year-old Norwegian man, boarded a Braathens SAFE Boeing 737-205 in Trondheim on route to Oslo, threatening the crew with an air gun and falsely claiming that he had placed explosives throughout the plane. After landing in Oslo, the aircraft was surrounded by police, and negotiations for the plane’s 116 passengers and 5 crewmembers began. Throughout the hijacking, Huseby grew increasingly inebriated, consuming the plane’s entire beer supply and demanding more from authorities, gradually letting out some of the passengers in the process. After Huseby agreed to give up his air gun in exchange for more beer, police stormed the plane and he was taken into custody. The troubled young man, who had a history of mental problems, and issues with alcohol abuse, expressed regret for his actions, which he said were meant to attract government attention to the issue. He served three years in prison and five years of preventative supervision. No one was hurt in the incident.

© Wikipedia / Michel Gilliand
Braathens SAFE Boeing 737-205 LN-SUG at Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport

 

Stealing a Plane for Love

On March 29, 2016, Seif Eldin Mustafa took over an EgyptAir Airbus A-320-200 on route from Alexandria to Cairo with 63 passengers and crew onboard. Claiming he was wearing an explosive belt (later revealed to contain mobile phones but no explosives), Mustafa forced the plane to be diverted to Cyprus. After landing, everyone except a group of seven passengers and crew was freed, with the disgruntled passenger demanding to see his estranged wife, who lives in Cyprus, and demanding asylum in the country. The standoff ended peacefully, with the hijacker surrendering and being arrested. Egyptian officials branded Mustafa an “idiot,” saying that while “terrorists are crazy … they aren’t stupid. This guy is.”

A man named Seif Eldin Mustafa, who was arrested after he hijacked an EgyptAir flight, which was forced to land in Cyprus on Tuesday, gestures as he is transferred by Cypriot police from a court in the city of Larnaca, Cyprus March 30, 2016.


Decades Of Mismanagement Turned US Forests Into “Slow-motion Time Bombs”

By Michael Bastasch

  • Wildfire experts say poor management, not global warming, is the major reason behind worsening wildfires.
  • Forester Bob Zybach warned decades ago that environmental regulations and less logging would make fires worse.
  • The Trump administration is doing more active management of lands, but is it enough?

Bob Zybach feels like a broken record. Decades ago he warned government officials allowing Oregon’s forests to grow unchecked by proper management would result in catastrophic wildfires.

While some want to blame global warming for the uptick in catastrophic wildfires, Zybach said a change in forest management policies is the main reason Americans are seeing a return to more intense fires, particularly in the Pacific Northwest and California where millions of acres of protected forests stand.

“We knew exactly what would happen if we just walked away,” Zybach, an experienced forester with a PhD in environmental science, told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Zybach spent two decades as a reforestation contractor before heading to graduate school in the 1990s. Then the Clinton administration in 1994 introduced its plan to protect old growth trees and spotted owls by strictly limiting logging.

Less logging also meant government foresters weren’t doing as much active management of forests — thinnings, prescribed burns and other activities to reduce wildfire risk. (RELATED: Scientists Issue ‘Absurd’ Doomsday Prediction, Warn Of A ‘Hothouse Earth’)

Zybach told Evergreen magazine that year the Clinton administration’s plan for “naturally functioning ecosystems” free of human interference ignored history and would fuel “wildfires reminiscent of the Tillamook burn, the 1910 fires and the Yellowstone fire.”

Between 1952 and 1987, western Oregon only one major fire above 10,000 acres. The region’s relatively fire-free streak ended with the Silver Complex Fire of 1987 that burned more than 100,000 acres in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness area, torching rare plants and trees the federal government set aside to protect from human activities. The area has burned several more times since the 1980s.

“Mostly fuels were removed through logging, active management — which they stopped — and grazing,” Zybach said in an interview. “You take away logging, grazing and maintenance, and you get firebombs.”

Now, Oregonians are dealing with 13 wildfires engulfing 185,000 acres. California is battling nine fires scorching more than 577,000 acres, mostly in the northern forested parts of the state managed by federal agencies.

The Mendocino Complex Fire quickly spread to become the largest wildfire in California since the 1930s, engulfing more than 283,000 acres. The previous wildfire record was set by 2017’s Thomas Fire that scorched 281,893 acres in Southern California.

While bad fires still happen on state and private lands, most of the massive blazes happen on or around lands managed by the U.S. Forest Service and other federal agencies, Zybach said. Poor management has turned western forests into “slow-motion time bombs,” he said.

“If we can’t manage our forests, what the hell?” Zybach told TheDCNF.

Is It Global Warming?

The rash of massive fires has reignited the debate over how best to handle wildfires. Experts agree that a century of fire suppression caused forests to become overgrown and filled with dead wood and debris that easily ignites in dry summer heat.

However, there’s disagreement over whether or not global warming has exacerbated western wildfires. Some scientists, those often quoted in the news, link global warming to a longer wildfire season and more intense heat.

California Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown said bigger wildfires were part of a “new normal” because of global warming. People will just have to adapt to it, the governor said while touring the destruction left by the Carr Fire.

But attributing wildfires to man-made warming is trickier than many scientists let on given the myriad of factors that determine the intensity of fires.

“Global warming may contribute slightly, but the key factors are mismanaged forests, years of fire suppression, increased population, people living where they should not, invasive flammable species, and the fact that California has always had fire,” University of Washington climate scientist Cliff Mass told TheDCNF.

Mass also noted there hasn’t been much warming in the Pacific Northwest, adding that natural weather patterns in California prime the state for wildfires every year no matter what.

“Many of the media and some politicians has been pushing a false narrative: that the fires are mainly about global warming. They are not,” Mass said in an email. Mass also criticized politicians and the media for trying to make last year’s wildfire season about global warming.

Zybach also doesn’t buy that global warming is exacerbating fires. Through his research, Zybach analyzed thousands of official documents, reports and first-hand accounts of wildfire activity going back hundreds of years. His conclusion: wildfire season hasn’t changed much.

“To say there’s been another change, other than management, is just grasping at straws,” Zybach said.

What has changed is land management. For example, declines in timber production on federal lands, particularly in the Northwest, not only meant the death of a once vibrant industry, but also an end to thinning, controlled burns and other activities meant to keep forest growth in check.

Wildfire experts have also increasingly been pointing to the fact that more people and infrastructure are located in wildfire-prone areas than in the past, increasing the risk of wildfires impacting livelihoods.

A recent study found the number of homes at risk of wildfires in the western U.S. increased 1,000 percent since 1940, from about 607,000 in 1940 to 6.7 million. Since most fires are ignited by humans, the more people in fire-prone areas the higher the risk.

“This is a people problem,” said U.S. Geological Survey fire expert Jon Keeley. “What’s changing is not the fires themselves but the fact that we have more and more people at risk.”

Ticking Forest Fire Bombs

The Klondike Fire is one of several fires raging in southern Oregon, igniting more than 30,000 acres of protected forest and covering nearby towns with smoke and ash.

The nearby Taylor Fire has engulfed more than 41,000 acres, including protected woods. Officials are worried the two fires could combine.

The Klondike and Taylor fires are the fourth and fifth major blazes to burn through the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest since 1987 when the Silver Complex Fire burnt up more than 100,000 acres.

The Siskiyou National Forest encompasses 1.8 million acres in northern California through southwestern Oregon. The park also encompasses the Kalmiopsis Wilderness, which was created by Congress in 1964 to protect the rare plant life in the region.

However, before the Silver fire, you have to go back to the 1930s to find a comparable fire, according to Forest Service figures. Fires are labeled “complex” when two or more combine.

Oregon, like much of the western U.S., was ravaged by massive wildfires in the 1930s during the Dust Bowl drought. Megafires were largely contained due to logging and policies to actively manage forests, but there’s been an increasing trend since the 1980s of larger fires.

Active management of the forests and logging kept fires at bay for decades, but that largely ended in the 1980s over concerns too many old growth trees and the northern spotted owl. Lawsuits from environmental groups hamstrung logging and government planners cut back on thinning trees and road maintenance.

Zybach said Native Americans used controlled burns to manage the landscape in Oregon, Washington and northern California for thousands of years. Tribes would burn up to 1 million acres a year on the west coast to prime the land for hunting and grazing, Zybach’s research has shown.

“The Indians had lots of big fires, but they were controlled,” Zybach said. “It’s the lack of Indian burning, the lack of grazing” and other active management techniques that caused fires to become more destructive in the 19th and early 20th centuries before logging operations and forest management techniques got fires under control in the mid-20th Century.

What Will Trump Do?

In a recent tweet, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke blamed the “overload of dead and diseased timber in the forests makes the fires worse and more deadly.” the secretary called for more active management of forests to reduce fuel loads.

President Donald Trump signed legislation in March to prevent federal agencies from using forest management funding to pay for fire suppression, but that’s only a partial fix. Federal agencies need to be given more flexibility to clear forests of debris and lessen fuel loads.

The Forest Service planned to treat and clear more vegetation and harvest more timber than in 2017 to prevent fuel build-up. But that’s only happening on a fraction of the 193 million acres managed by federal foresters. Zybach said more needs to be done to get fuel loads down and reduce wildfire risks.

“It would make our forests safe and beautiful again and would create jobs,” Zybach said.

 


 

Top 5 Firearms You Need To Get Your Hands On NOW!

To the individual who is either interested in Prepping or already knee-deep into preparing for any number of potential emergencies or disasters, security has to be one of your primary concerns. This is not any truer if you have a family than if you are all alone. The simple fact of life is that when people are scared, hurting or in some other way seriously under duress, the niceness of society disappears quickly. Someone who used to be your best friend will kill you if you are standing between food and their baby is starving.

It should be clear from any number of recent disasters where looting happened within days that you and your family need to plan for security wherever you are. Firearms are most commonly (and for good reason) associated with security. Are there other options? Sure, but I would rather have my trusty shotgun as opposed to a baseball bat and harsh language if there were a bunch of people trying to knock down my door any day. So, with that in mind, below are my list of the top 5 firearms you need to get your hands on now. This of course assumes you don’t have any firearms for personal protection and you aren’t philosophically opposed to defending your family’s life with deadly force if it comes to that.

#1 Shotgun

The Wilson Combat CQB Shotgun – When you have a lot of money to spend.

As I explained in my earlier post, if you only have the time or means to purchase one firearm to defend yourself and your family it should be a shotgun. Shotguns are everywhere and they are relatively inexpensive to purchase. Where is the best place to purchase a shotgun? You can walk into just about any WalMart and pick up a reasonably priced shotgun without too many people even blinking. Shotguns are pretty simple to use, hold on average 5-6 shots and come with a variety of ammunition options. For home defense or close quarters, a shotgun is very forgiving with respect to nervous aiming. By that I mean you don’t have to be very accurate with a shotgun to do some damage. Even the sound of racking the slide up and down can be an effective deterrent although many will disagree with that assertion. The two most common calibers are .12 and .20 gauge. The .20 gauge is usually recommended for women and smaller kids because the recoil is less.

In addition to home defense, a shotgun is perfectly suited for hunting both small game and larger animals with the right type of ammunition. Another plus is that shotguns are plentiful and the ammunition isn’t 4 times as high now with the recent talk of gun confiscation by the federal government. You can still pick up plenty of ammo and a nice new shotgun fairly easily. For the tactical minded prepper, you can even augment your shotgun with lots of accessories similar to your pistol or AR-15.

#2 AR-15

AR15 – Hands down the most versatile weapon you can have if the SHTF.

On top of its usefulness at taking out bad guys, it uses the same ammunition that your local police department, National Guard, military and now Homeland security use and are buying more of every day. The chance that you will be able to acquire some ammunition that is compatible with your AR-15 is very high in certain conditions. 

Speaking of AR-15’s… This would be my second choice if you have a shotgun already. There are several reasons for making an AR-15 next on your purchase list. The first is that this is the weapon you want to use in a variety of other solutions and its strengths lie outside of the shotgun’s sweet spot. The AR-15 chambered in .556 (will also shoot .223) gives you a highly flexible weapon platform. The AR-15 holds a higher capacity of ammunition so you will need to reload less often. When would you possibly need 30 rounds of ammunition? What if your home was being overrun by 50 people who had wandered off the highway from the town 20 miles away and they were deadly intent on taking your home and your possessions away from you? Or on the other end of the spectrum, what if a whole bus load of zombies was walking across the parking lot towards you. Wouldn’t you rather be able to take out 30 of the closest ones before you had to reload? The AR-15, unlike a shotgun is a medium distance hero. Where the shotgun is good for close quarters, you can’t count on hitting anything using a shotgun with any real power above 40-50 yards. The AR-15, in a competent shooter’s hand is excellent up to 300 meters on any day. I would rather take care of the bad guys when they are very far away from me and my family.

Now, the rub is that because of the recent antics by some in our Congress, AR-15’s and the ammunition that go in them is harder to come by. It isn’t impossible though and you can still get an AR-15 for your very own personal use in most locations if you are willing to look around and wait a while. Where can you purchase an AR-15? You can still find quite a few at gun shows everywhere and even at places like Gander Mountain and Cabella’s. Dicks Sporting goods is not stocking them anymore I believe. Pawn shops and gun stores also have them in stock, but you will be paying a premium now unfortunately. I don’t believe this will change any time soon. If you are waiting for the price to go back to what it was last summer I think you will be out of luck. There are also places online you can purchase them and have them shipped to your local FFL dealer. The dealer will usually charge you a small fee ($25 is normal) for the transaction and long wait times are still going to be a factor. Ammunition is tougher to get and more expensive but it is still out there. Shop around online and go to your gun shows. My research shows that the prices are just about the same, once you add in shipping. Know what the price of 500 and 1000 rounds are before you go to the gun show so you can be a savvy shopper.

#3 Full-size Semi-automatic Pistol – .45 or .40

Glock 22 – Perfect as your sidearm or nightstand gun.

Pistols are usually the first firearm people choose for a few reasons. They are easier to handle, easier to hide and less wieldy in general. They are the weapon most of the good guys use in the movies so the natural inclination is to get a pistol and you will be all set like Bruce Willis in Die Hard. Pistols definitely have their place, but they would come after an AR-15 and a shotgun in my opinion. Why is that? A wise man once said that “a pistol is what you use to get back to your rifle”. Pistols are for close quarters and you want that to be a last resort. You don’t want to be that close to any bad guys. However, it happens and pistols are an important aspect of your survival battery of arms. Run out of ammunition in your shotgun or AR-15 and then you grab the pistol. Bad guy kicks in the door while you are asleep then you reach for the pistol close to the bed

Why am I recommending .45 or .40 and not a .9mm? It comes down to stopping power really and I know I may get some blow-back on this topic. I have all three calibers, but if I could only buy one and I was buying this for home defense it would be a .40 caliber. Why not a .45? Well, for the simple fact that you can hold more rounds in the magazine of most .40 calibers because the rounds are a little smaller. That is also why I recommend a full-size and not a sub-compact if you only have one. My 1911 .45 holds 8 rounds and my .40 holds 14. It’s just that I like options and having a few more rounds gives you more options. What about the .9mm you ask? It can hold up to 17 rounds. Yes, and like I said, I have .9mm also, but if you put a big freaked out psychopath in front of me with a machete and told me to pick one gun to use to take him down I would pick up the .45 or .40 before the .9mm.

Where is the best place to purchase a pistol for home defense? Pistols are not as in demand as AR-15’s yet. I was just at Gander Mountain last week and they still had full cases of pistols in all calibers and models. The prices still looked consistent with what I would expect at that store and the only shortage I saw was of Glock. They only had one G27 on display. I personally like purchasing handguns from a gun show but you have to know what you are looking for and the price range you are willing to pay. At a gun show you have a lot more people competing for your business. I recommend finding the gun you are after at every booth, talking to the seller and getting a price. I found $200 worth of difference the last time I went for the same make and caliber of handgun so you should shop around.

Ammunition for handguns is ridiculous now and it’s running about 4 times as expensive as what it used to last year this time. My advice is to get two 50 rounds boxes of hollow-points at a minimum and put those away. After that, go to places like ammunition.com or my new favorite bulkammo.com and order in bulk to build up your supply. Make sure you have at a minimum 4 magazines for each gun also.

#4 Long-Range Rife

Large Caliber .30-06 will take down any game in North America. No matter how many legs it has on it. Perfect for hunting and long-range marksmanship.

When it comes to a long-range rifle, I am talking about between 300 and 600 yards now and this is primarily for hunting. They can also be used to take over where your AR-15 begins to fall short. If you start going too far past 300 yards, your AR-15 will need a little help. Can you still hit targets at that range? Sure but I would rather have a caliber that isn’t slowing down already. My personal recommendation for a long-range rifle is a .30-06.

For one reason, the .30-06 is capable of taking down any big game in North America. You won’t run into an animal that can’t be hunted successfully with a .30-06. Are there other calibers that can do the job? Of course, but in addition to being a great all around hunting weapon, the .30-06 is also a common sniper caliber for police forces.

Where can you purchase a good hunting rifle? They are everywhere from WalMart, Dicks, Cabella’s, Gander Mountain and the local neighborhood pawn shop. You don’t generally need a license to purchase a long rifle and they have lots of use. The ammunition is going to be more expensive, but if you are hunting with this rifle, you will need less; unless you are a horrible shot.

#5 .22 (Pistol and Rifle)

The .22 is great for two things in my mind. In a rifle, the .22 is perfect for small game or varmints. A pistol is great for practice or for use by smaller children. A .22 is a great addition because you can use this to practice your accuracy and not spend a fortune on ammunition. While it is still way more expensive than it used to be you can buy hundreds of .22 ammunition for a fraction of the more common calibers. Additionally, if they ever do try to take away guns, they might leave you with a .22 and something is better than nothing.

Honorable Mentions – Also known as if you have money left over… try these on for size.

Mosin Nagant

The Mosin is a Russian rifle used primarily during WWII and routinely runs around $100 each. For the life of me, I could never find too many of them but if you have no other option, a Mosin is a great rifle to have and could pull dual duty as a hunting rifle or a backup battle rifle. Of course, there are many limitations with the latter approach.

Concealed Carry (.380)

Yes, I do believe every legal firearm owner should carry concealed. In my recent post on the subject I explained all of the reasons I think this is wise and good for society, but it would be one of the last firearms I chose. The reason is that for most people, carrying concealed isn’t a comfortable option unless you have a much smaller weapon. The .380 is perfect and can easily fit in a pocket or purse, but the capacity and stopping power are much lower.

To those of you, who actually finished this post, thank you for reading! I am eager to hear any comments from you on my opinions and what ideas you have for your own personal top 5.

.


 

Scientists Claim They’ve Solved The Bermuda Triangle Mystery

Source: Mac Slavo

 

Have scientists finally solved the mystery of the Bermuda triangle?  The infamous body of water in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean stretches 270,271 square miles between Florida, Bermuda, and Puerto-Rico.

The Bermuda Triangle has been the source of many strange occurrences and mysteries involving both aircraft and boats. It is also known as the Devil’s Triangle and the area features multiple shipping lanes and has claimed over 1,000 lives in the last 100 years. But scientists think they have finally figured out why this continues to happen.

Larry Kusche’s research revealed a number of inaccuracies and inconsistencies between Berlitz’s accounts and statements from eyewitnesses, participants, and others involved in the initial incidents. Kusche noted cases where pertinent information went unreported, such as the disappearance of round-the-world yachtsman Donald Crowhurst, which Berlitz had 

presented as a mystery, despite clear evidence to the contrary. Another example was the ore-carrier recounted by Berlitz as lost without trace three days out of an Atlantic port when it had been lost three days out of a port with the same name in the Pacific Ocean. Kusche also argued that a large percentage of the incidents that sparked allegations of the Triangle’s mysterious influence actually occurred well outside it. Often his research was simple: he would review period newspapers of the dates of reported incidents and find reports on possibly relevant events like unusual weather, that were never mentioned in the disappearance stories.

Kusche concluded that:

  • The number of ships and aircraft reported missing in the area was not significantly greater, proportionally speaking, than in any other part of the ocean.
  • In an area frequented by tropical cyclones, the number of disappearances that did occur were, for the most part, neither disproportionate, unlikely, nor mysterious.
  • Furthermore, Berlitz and other writers would often fail to mention such storms or even represent the disappearance as having happened in calm conditions when meteorological records clearly contradict this.
  • The numbers themselves had been exaggerated by sloppy research. A boat’s disappearance, for example, would be reported, but its eventual (if belated) return to port may not have been.
  • Some disappearances had, in fact, never happened. One plane crash was said to have taken place in 1937, off Daytona Beach, Florida, in front of hundreds of witnesses; a check of the local papers revealed nothing.
  • The legend of the Bermuda Triangle is a manufactured mystery, perpetuated by writers who either purposely or unknowingly made use of misconceptions, faulty reasoning, and sensationalism.

In a 2013 study, the World Wide Fund for Nature identified the world’s 10 most dangerous waters for shipping, but the Bermuda Triangle was not among them.

Triangle writers have used a number of supernatural concepts to explain the events. One explanation pins the blame on leftover technology from the mythical lost continent of Atlantis. Sometimes connected to the Atlantis story is the submerged rock formation known as the Bimini Road off the island of Bimini in the Bahamas, which is in the Triangle by some definitions. Followers of the purported psychic Edgar Cayce take his prediction that evidence of Atlantis would be found in 1968, as referring to the discovery of the Bimini Road. Believers describe the formation as a road, wall, or other structure, but the Bimini Road is of natural origin.

Other writers attribute the events to UFOs. This idea was used by Steven Spielberg for his science fiction film Close Encounters of the Third Kind, which features the lost Flight 19 aircrews as alien abductees.

Charles Berlitz, author of various books on anomalous phenomena, lists several theories attributing the losses in the Triangle to anomalous or unexplained forces.

A paranormal explanation in the 2005 three-part US-British-German science fiction miniseries The Triangle, says the triangle is a wormhole.

Natural explanations

Compass variations

Compass problems are one of the cited phrases in many Triangle incidents. While some have theorized that unusual local magnetic anomalies may exist in the area, such anomalies have not been found. Compasses have natural magnetic variations in relation to the magnetic poles, a fact which navigators have known for centuries. Magnetic (compass) north and geographic (true) north are exactly the same only for a small number of places – for example, as of 2000, in the United States, only those places on a line running from Wisconsin to the Gulf of Mexico. But the public may not be as informed, and think there is something mysterious about a compass “changing” across an area as large as the Triangle, which it naturally will.

False-color image of the Gulf Stream
flowing north through the western Atlantic Ocean. (NASA)

Gulf Stream

The Gulf Stream is a major surface current, primarily driven by thermohaline circulation that originates in the Gulf of Mexico and then flows through the Straits of Florida into the North Atlantic. In essence, it is a river within an ocean, and, like a river, it can and does carry floating objects. It has a maximum surface velocity of about 2 m/s (6.6 ft/s). A small plane making a water landing or a boat having engine trouble can be carried away from its reported position by the current.

Human error

One of the most cited explanations in official inquiries as to the loss of any aircraft or vessel is human error. Human stubbornness may have caused businessman Harvey Conover to lose his sailing yacht, Revonoc, as he sailed into the teeth of a storm south of Florida on January 1, 1958.

Violent weather

Hurricanes are powerful storms that form in tropical waters and have historically cost thousands of lives and caused billions of dollars in damage. The sinking of Francisco de Bobadilla’s Spanish fleet in 1502 was the first recorded instance of a destructive hurricane. These storms have in the past caused a number of incidents related to the Triangle.

A powerful downdraft of cold air was suspected to be a cause in the sinking of Pride of Baltimore on May 14, 1986. The crew of the sunken vessel noted the wind suddenly shifted and increased velocity from 32 km/h (20 mph) to 97–145 km/h (60–90 mph). A National Hurricane Center satellite specialist, James Lushine, stated “during very unstable weather conditions the downburst of cold air from aloft can hit the surface like a bomb, exploding outward like a giant squall line of wind and water.” A similar event occurred to Concordia in 2010, off the coast of Brazil. Scientists are currently investigating whether “hexagonal” clouds may be the source of these up-to-170 mph (270 km/h) “air bombs”.

In August 2018, British scientists speculated that 100 feet (30 m) “rogue” waves could be the reason why so many boats have been sunk in the Bermuda Triangle.

Methane hydrates

Worldwide distribution of confirmed or inferred offshore gas hydrate-bearing sediments, 1996.
Source: United States Geological Survey

An explanation for some of the disappearances has focused on the presence of large fields of methane hydrates (a form of natural gas) on the continental shelves. Laboratory experiments carried out in Australia have proven that bubbles can, indeed, sink a scale model ship by decreasing the density of the water; any wreckage consequently rising to the surface would be rapidly dispersed by the Gulf Stream. It has been hypothesized that periodic methane eruptions (sometimes called “mud volcanoes”) may produce regions of frothy water that are no longer capable of providing adequate buoyancy for ships. If this were the case, such an area forming around a ship could cause it to sink very rapidly and without warning.

Publications by the USGS describe large stores of undersea hydrates worldwide, including the Blake Ridge area, off the coast of the southeastern United States. However, according to the USGS, no large releases of gas hydrates are believed to have occurred in the Bermuda Triangle for the past 15,000 years.

According to Fox News, experts at the University of Southampton believe the mystery can be explained by a natural phenomenon known as “rogue waves.” Appearing on aChannel 5 documentary “The Bermuda Triangle Enigma,” the scientists used indoor simulators to re-create the monster water surges. These waves, some of which measure 100 feet high, only last for a few minutes. They were first observed by satellites in 1997 off the coast of South Africa and are often seen as the source of so many lost ships.

The research team built a model of the USS Cyclops, a huge vessel which went missing in the triangle in 1918 claiming 300 lives and used it in their indoors simulator. Because of its sheer size and flat base, it did not take long before the model is overcome with water during the simulation, according to Fox News

Dr. Simon Boxall, an ocean and earth scientist, claims that the Bermuda Triangle area in the Atlantic can see three massive storms coming together from different directions, making the perfect conditions for a rogue wave. Such a massive surge in water could snap a boat, such as the USS Cyclops, into two pieces, said Boxall.  “There are storms to the south and north, which come together.  And if there are additional ones from Florida, it can be a potentially deadly formation of rogue waves,” Boxall added.

“They [the rogue waves] are steep, they are high – we’ve measured waves in excess of 30 meters (98 feet),” said Boxall.