Survivalist News Network

The Fall & Winter Prepper Checklist: 9 Things To Get Your Home Prepped for Disasters

By Jeremiah Johnson

It’s time to get to the business of readying the house for winter. Be aware that Hurricane Season is here and Fire Season has not ended. This article is a reminder of the things you need to get done and squared away before the cold weather arrives.

1. Wood Supply

In years past, I’ve emphasized this continually. Now is the time (if fire season precludes use of chainsaws) to cut your wood and to assure your wood supply is ready and accessible. This is both for winter and as a prep: if everything goes down the tubes tomorrow, you will find that the nice fire becomes a necessary fire to heat the home and to cook food. Make sure you have a supply that you can put the majority of the wood, and an area that is readily accessible. Make certain your wood is off of the ground and that it is protected: either under a roof (as in a woodshed) or under a tarp. Cut it all now, and do a sound estimate on your rate of consumption under adverse conditions (loss of power, or SHTF scenario). Don’t forget fire starting materials and a good supply of newspaper: since the latter contains no “news” it’s perfect for burning and can be stored in your woodshed. Ensure chainsaws, axes, splitters, and other tools are in good working order and ready to use. And don’t forget about new box of matches!

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10 Ways to Preserve Meat Without a Fridge or Freezer

Take a look at the average prepper’s pantry and you’ll see lots of rice, beans, pasta, canned veggies, dehydrated fruits, and so forth. But take a look at their daily diet and you’ll see lots of beef, steak, chicken, and other meats. See the problem?

Many preppers love to eat meat, but unfortunately, they have a tendency to only store it in the fridge or freezer. What are they going to do for meat if the power grid goes down and the refrigerator no longer works?

The good news is, there are more ways to store meat that most people realize. In this article, we’ll take a look at ten ways to preserve meat without a fridge or freezer, divided into the five most common and the five least common.

Five Most Common Meat Preservation Methods

1. Canning Meat

Canning is simply a process where food is preserved by being sealed in an airtight container, with an expected shelf life of around two to three years at a minimum.

Canning meat is definitely one of the more popular and well-known methods for preserving meat, but it’s also one that will require some practice to get it right, and you’ll want to be very careful so you don’t end up with botulism.

Whereas some foods can be canned with a water bath canner, you can’t safely preserve meat this way. Rather, you’ll need to use a good pressure canner.

It works by heating water and trapping the resulting steam in a pressurized container, which raises the temperature to 240 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, killing any and all bacteria. It might sound intimidating at first, but pressure canners are perfectly safe once you know how to use them.

Here is a guide to canning meat.

2. Curing (aka Salting)

Curing, otherwise known as salting, is one of the oldest known meat preservation methods. In fact, this method was even used by the Ancient Romans.

Curing is also a unique process because it can be used effectively for most types of meat (poultry, pork, fish, beef, etc.) and it works for both cooked and raw meat as well.

To cure meat, first, you’ll want to remove as much fat as possible. Then you can rub salt and any other spices you want over the meat, completely covering it. You’ll then want to refrigerate it for at least a week (or place it outside in cold–but not freezing–weather, out of direct sunlight). Finally, rinse off all the salt and other mixes with water.

Afterward, you’ll need to tightly wrap the meat in cheesecloth. Store the meat in a dry and cool place and it should be safe to eat for two to three months. Below you’ll find a detailed guide to curing meat at home.

3. Dehydration

One of the easiest ways to store meat is to dehydrate it. There are two options for pursuing this route with modern technology: a solar dehydrator, or an electric dehydrator.

Solar dehydrators have the unique advantage of not requiring electricity, though they are also dependent on getting plenty of sunlight.

If you choose not to use a dehydrator, you can use an oven. Or if you prefer a more traditional path, you can simply hang the meat in the sunlight. You’ll just need to make sure your meat has been cut into very thin slices with as much fat removed as possible.

4. Freeze Drying Method

In order to freeze dry meat, you will need to purchase a freeze dryer. Unfortunately, they are very expensive, which means that this may not be the most practical option for many of you. That being said, if you do choose to purchase a freeze dryer, then this method is certainly one of the best options available for preserving meat.

Furthermore, just about any food can be freeze-dried. You can even freeze-dry leftovers if you want to. In fact, some of the most popular survival foods on the market are freeze-dried. You can also arrange them in jars, and since almost anything can be freeze-dried, you can easily create a good all-around meal in a jar.

By purchasing a freeze dryer as well, most of the steps that you would need to take will be done for you. You’ll simply need to slice up your meat into thinner pieces and then place them on the trays of the freeze dryer. The freeze dryer will then drop the temperature inside to as much as fifty degrees below Fahrenheit, creating a vacuum around the meat.

After that, the inside of the freeze dryer is warmed and the water is converted into vapor, removing it from the meat. So the meat is frozen, then dried. Thus the term, freeze-dried.

5. Smoking

Last but not least, smoking is easily one of the most traditional meat preservation methods in existence, and it’s been around for centuries.

Historically, meat smoking has been used in areas with high humidity where dehydrating or air drying meat was simply impossible. Though of course, those were in the days before dehydrators were invented.

Meat smoking also has the distinct advantage of making your meat very flavorful. Most people who smoke meat don’t do it for preservation, but rather for the taste.

In order to smoke meat, you’ll need to have a backyard. Basically, you soak wood chips in water for a full day, and then place those chips into the smoke box. You set the temperature of the smoker to how you want it, then you spread the meat over the racks within the smoke.

You’ll then need to cook the meat until you get it to the right temperature (different meat types have different temperature requirements) and continue to add smoke. You’ll need to continue to add more wood chips to the smoker as well. It’s the smoke that produces the flavor.

You can purchase a small smoker, or you could build your own smokehouse.

Five Least Common Meat Preservation Methods

6. Biltong

Biltong is a process where pieces of meat are marinated in vinegar for several hours before being flavored in rock salt, whole coriander, black peppercorns, and sometimes brown sugar, baking soda, barbeque spice, or cloves.

The meat is then allowed to sit for a few hours before being hung out to dry. This method is similar to the process of creating jerky, and the meat will be able to last for a long time outside of the fridge or freezer. Watch the video below to learn how to make it.

7. Brining

Brining is a more traditional form of meat preservation. If done properly, it can make your meat last for several years.

 

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Brine is simply a mixture of water, salt, and brown sugar (the sugar is optional). You soak your meat in the mixture for several weeks, and you can eat it at any time. When it’s done, after a month or so, you can store it at room temperature. Although to be on the safe side, you should keep it as cool as possible.

It works because salt gets into the meat and stops bacteria from spreading. Meanwhile, the water keeps it nice and moist. Here is some more information about brined meat.

8. Lard

Another old-school method for preserving meat is to preserve it in lard. This can actually be a very practical preservation method if you have a lot of fat on hand. Basically, you just place your meat in a crockpot and cover it with melted lard.

This works for preservation because the lard stops air from reaching the meat, thus stopping bacteria from growing as well. This method is very cheap and easy, and it’s also effective.

Afterward, you’ll always want to store the meat in a cool and dry location. Under no circumstances will you want to store meat covered in lard in a hot environment.

Here’s some more information on preserving food in lard.

9. Rillette

Rillette isn’t so much a meat preservation method as much as it is a meal on its own. Basically, you take some port and chop it up, salt each piece, and then cook it in fat until it can be shredded. You then wait for the meat to be cooled until you can form it into a paste. Finally, you pack it in glass jars.

Usually, rillette is used as an addition to meals, such as spreading it over bread. You can add herbs to it such as thyme, oregano, or lavender to greatly increase the flavor. When properly done, rillette can last you for at least a month. Watch the video below to learn how to make it.

10. Sugar Syrup Method

Did you know that you can also preserve meat by using sugar? In fact, this may be one of the most accessible methods for the ordinary person. Examples of foods you can preserve using sugar include ham, pork, bacon, and fruit.

What you’ll need to do is chop up your meat into small pieces. Place that meat into a clean mason jar, then fill up the rest of the jar with sugar syrup. Proceed to seal the jar completely shut, and you’re all set. It works because the sugar prevents the growth of bacteria.

Conclusion

Everyone needs protein in their diet, especially in a survival scenario, so unless you plan on stockpiling tons of nuts and beans, you need to store some meat. And if you’re currently relying on a fridge or freezer to store your meat, you need to look into some of these other meat preservation methods while you still can on.

 

 


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Metallic Cartridge Reloading In The Prepper Tool Kit

By Matt W.

Being a “doer” like most preppers I have always been fascinated with the idea of loading my own ammo. Perhaps caught up in the advertising that shows a rugged individual working a re-loader in a nice wood-paneled room full of hunting gear and trophies, wearing a plaid flannel shirt, a steaming cup of coffee (or hot chocolate) on the bench, with trees in autumn colors outside the window, and of course, his favorite hunting dog laying at his feet in anticipation of time in the field filling his head. 

The cold hard fact from my point of view is that I did not do enough shooting to really justify the initial investment. I once actually had the whole deal in a shopping cart at a favorite supply store. I love hunting upland birds and shooting skeet and trap, but life has gotten in the way of that almost daily. Am I the only one who realizes the more time-saving gadgets I have the less time I have to take advantage of them? So I returned everything to its rightful place back on the shelf. I was looking at $900 and couldn’t justify it not having shot that much commercial ammunition in the preceding 18 months. Of course I would be ahead now, 6 years later, but just barely. And now, looking at favorite pistol and rifle calibers, I see some sense in it as I once had a 264 Winchester Magnum that was a GREAT varmint rifle but commercial ammo was expensive, still is. Traded it away when $$$ was tight. Don’t know that I would have shot it enough to recoup the investment but I would love to have that rifle back. The clarity of hindsight.

In any case I would love to hear what other preppers think on the subject. Wild Bill


With the interest in the preparedness lifestyle growing at an explosive rate, one important skill is often brushed aside: reloading ammunition. Often, persons embarking on their own personal prepping journey will procrastinate on learning to reload their own ammunition. The reasons to put off learning to reload are understandable. Often, many people would rather just buy more firearms and more ammunition than put the time and money into learning reloading. People usually are put off by the expense of reloading equipment, feel that they do not have the time to learn reloading, or they do not have a person available to teach them.

Learning about all the reloading equipment and techniques can seem daunting at first but the skill is worth the effort. The initial investment in equipment and supplies for reloading can cost as little as about $300 or as much as one is willing to spend. However, there are many benefits to making the investment. First, a person can save a lot of money reloading, quickly recouping the startup costs. Second, by reloading ammunition a person can get much improved accuracy over using only factory ammunition. Third, for many rifle and pistol calibers a hand-loader will have many more choices available than solely relying on factory offerings, the combinations of components are near infinite. Fourth, reloading will allow a person to have ample supply of hard to find ammunition for a favorite pet caliber, unusual and rare cartridge, or old hunting rifle. Finally, when the next ammo shortage happens the reloader will be able to maintain his / her stockpile. As can be seen, there are many good reasons for preppers to take up reloading and each one will be looked in more detail.

Without a doubt, one of the most popular reasons that persons learn to reload ammunition is to save money. Ammunition is expensive and it is not getting any cheaper! However, anywhere from 65% to 80% of the cost of ammunition is in the cartridge case. Therefore, a person should always pick up their spent cartridge cases. That reusable brass case ties up a bunch of money, too much money to just leave laying on the ground like garbage. For example: if a box of rifle ammunition cost around $20 then about $15 of that is likely tied up in just the cartridge cases. No one would walk by $15 laying on the ground and not pick it up but people will leave perfectly good cartridge cases laying all over the range. A person could reload that box of ammo for $5 or less. That savings adds up fast and recoups the initial investment in equipment. The amount of money saved can be used to buy more ammo, more guns, optics, range time, training, prepping supplies, and on and on. If shooting those big safari rifles is appealing, the savings to the reloader are truly amazing. Some big game rifles cost the shooter anywhere from $5 to over $25 every time the trigger is pulled. This cost can prevent any frequent or meaningful target practice, often even impairing properly sighting in the weapon or zeroing a scope. Reloading can make shooting these big guns affordable and fun. As mentioned earlier, cost savings is a major motivator for reloaders. As a person living the preparedness lifestyle, allocating money and resources properly to maintain a regular life while preparing for the worst events is an ongoing process. Reloading is a good way to help preppers cut cost and spare resources.

Obtaining greater accuracy is another good reason to learn reloading. Many people who start reloading just to save money quickly discover this benefit. The quest for peak accuracy is what gets many people really fired up about reloading. Once a person experiences how easy it is to increase accuracy for a given load, they are well on the way to a life time of reloading. Firearms are expensive. Many times, people have been very disappointed with a new firearms shot groups, assuming there is a problem with the expensive new weapon. After hand-loading some ammunition, they have discovered there is nothing wrong with the weapon and that factory available ammunition is causing this sub-par performance. For example: this is very typical for 45 Colt revolvers. Historically, there has been some variation in bore diameters of production revolvers in this caliber. For safety reasons, the major ammunition manufacturers will produce loaded ammo with bullets in the smallest produced bore diameter. In some guns, these too small bullets will not engage the rifling’s and just rattle down the barrel, flying erratically out the muzzle. Accuracy is unbelievably poor when this happens. An easy fix for a reloader is to determine the bore diameter and reload using bullets of the appropriate diameter. This method has been proven to turn poorly grouping guns into tack drivers. Sometimes, the problem with a firearms accuracy is not in the gun but in the ammunition. Loading one’s own ammunition can help correct that.

Reloading greatly improves consistency and uniformity in the loaded cartridges. Hand-loading can definitely help with increasing accuracy over the modest distances of handgun ranges but the most dramatic improvements can be gained over the longer ranges usually shot with rifles. Some factory ammunition is very good. However, hand-loads will give the best and most accurate results over factory loaded ammunition. Much of the accuracy potential in a batch of hand-loads comes from consistency gained through precise attention to detail. With factory ammunition, there can easily be a 5% to 10% variation in muzzle velocity from shot to shot. A careful hand-loader can greatly reduce that variation in muzzle velocity, which will give a more consistent point of impact. Reloaders can also adjust the overall length of the loaded cartridge by adjusting bullet seating depth to better match the specific weapon they are using. This will improve accuracy by reducing bullet jump (distance a bullet travels before engaging the rifling) and more closely aligning the bullet center with the bore axis when the rifling is engaged, resulting in a better spin and truer flight. A careful reloader can more precisely align the bullet into the case, keeping the center of the bullet more closely on the axis of the weapon’s bore. The reloader is in control of every variable of the cartridge. The case lengths can be trimmed to exact specifications. Case mouths and crimping can be uniformed. Any possible variable can be minimized or eliminated to produce the most consistent ammunition, which all leads to better shot groups. Competitive shooters have long known that hand-loading is the way to get out the most accuracy from their weapons.

 

If a person is not shooting one of the more popular calibers, they may be disappointed with choices in factory available ammunition. Some of the lesser known, newly introduced, or very old calibers will not have enough choices of bullet styles and weights available in factory production ammunition. Some very capable cartridges are no longer offered in newly manufactured ammunition. A reloader will still have the ability to produce ammunition for these discontinued calibers. Dies and cartridge cases can still be purchased for calibers that have been discontinued long ago. Handloading or reloading ammunition is a way to get around these limitations.

The combinations of components are limitless. Bullet weights and shapes can be chosen specifically for maximum efficiency for any given purpose. Different bullet tip shapes, ogives, and base configurations can be chosen to fit a rifle or load for greater accuracy, consistency, or function. A person can load expanding bullets into cartridges for old surplus rifles that are generally only available in full metal jacket configuration, turning that old surplus rifle into a viable hunting weapon. Different propellants will burn with different rates and characteristics. This will affect muzzle velocity, consistency, and accuracy. With so many possible combinations of bullets, propellants, primers, and cases, a person can tailor a specific load for any purpose. If the goal is to get maximum efficiency, maximum utility, maximum accuracy, or effectiveness over a wide range of shooting distances, reloaders can tailor ammunition to any purpose. The sky’s the limit on possible loadings.

Money lying on the ground?

One very important thing to anyone living the preparedness lifestyle is securing and maintaining an ammunition supply. In recent years in the United States, we have experienced several ammunition shortages of varying degrees and durations. Everyone knows that is not a question of whether or not there will be another ammunition supply interruption but when the next big one is coming. The author remembers a time when he would give no consideration to leaving the house with a firearm without any ammo thinking “I’ll just pick up some on the way to the shooting range.” It is getting better but not quite back to those days yet. Certainly, anyone reading this article has not so distant memories of going to wally-world and seeing the ammo shelves empty. During the last ammo shortage, reloading components were still available for a time after all the ammo was off the shelves, allowing reloaders to stock up on components before the supply temporarily dried up. Reloading components are easy to stock up on. For example: at the time of writing this article Unique and Power Pistol powders were about $20 a pound. A person could load up around 1,150 rounds of 9mm ammo with one pound of these powders! Store a few pounds of powder and a person is set up to last through the ammo drought. Another way for a reloader to cut cost and extend his or her ammo supply is to cast lead bullets. After the initial cost of equipment, money saved by casting bullets will quickly recover the startup costs. Additionally, lead could be gathered from alternative sources instead of buying it. This will allow the resourceful prepper to make lead bullets at no cost. With some components in storage, the resourceful prepper can spend a little time in the evening reloading and replenishing his or her ammo supply when everyone else is scrounging for ammo or getting gouged by online price hikes.

So, it’s easy to see how reloading is another valuable tool in well-rounded preppers kit. Many people tend to feel rushed and overwhelmed when coming into the preparedness lifestyle. Along with marksmanship, martial arts, archery, fishing, hunting, farming, canning, tanning, mechanics, carpentry, communications, first aid, sewing, sanitation, and land navigation (just to get started) reloading seems like a ton to learn. However, persons reading this already have a great asset: motivation. If a person is willing and motivated to learn, there is a wealth of resources available.

Everyone is different and learns differently. For some people, it will be very difficult to pick up a reloading manual and start off reloading without any issues. For most people, the easiest and fastest way to learn is to have a someone actually show them step by step how to do it. Unfortunately, unless someone already knows a friend or family member who reloads it can be difficult to connect with someone willing to teach. No one wants to deal with that grumpy old condescending jerk at the local gun shop or put up with the know it all attitude from gun show arm chair rangers. This is why I’ve taken it upon myself to bring reloading to the preparedness community. I had no one to help me when I was learning reloading. It was frustrating. There is a whole new crowd of people who are either first time gun owners or have a general interest in firearms but feel isolated because they don’t have good resource people in their social circle. Often these persons are turned off to guns or discouraged because someone at a gun shop or gun show discouraged them or talked to them like they were stupid. That is why I am passionate about teaching others to reload. I offer completely free help, advice, and information in an encouraging, supportive, and nonjudgmental environment through email. Even though anyone could pick up good info from my emails, my emails are geared toward persons who have no or very little knowledge and / or experience with reloading. All you need is an inbox and a desire to learn. I’m not compensated for this service in any way by any one. This is just my way to give back to a great community. I send out emails regularly with reloading related content. 


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Alert: Your Cell Phone is Spying on You! 4 Ways to Block Your Cell Phone and Prevent Being Monitored

By Jeremiah Johnson

“We are all just prisoners here…of our own device…” – “Hotel California,” by The Eagles

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this piece is on the heels of an article released by RT News on 3/8/17, entitled “85% of World’s Smart Phones ‘Weaponized’ by CIA.”  The article is a very disturbing report; however, it isn’t something that just “surfaced” out of the zone of unpredictability.  The basis for the report stems from the recent WikiLeaks release of the CIA-documents and information that just occurred.  Here is an excerpt from that article:

 “Google’s Android operating system, used in 85 percent of the world’s smart phones, including Samsung and Sony, was found to have 24 ‘zero days’ – the code name used by the CIA to identify and exploit vulnerabilities for the purpose of secretly collecting data on individuals.  The techniques allow the CIA to access data from social messaging platforms, including WhatsApp, Weibo and Clockman before encryption, according to WikiLeaks.  Both audio and message data were vulnerable to the exploit through the CIA’s exploitation of gaps in the OS.”

Now mind you, Readers, this piece is not a “news article,” although this event was just reported on 3/8/17.  The purpose of this article is to serve as a “wake-up” call, in case you haven’t taken the measures already outlined in previous articles to protect yourself from your own devices tracking, recording, and (essentially) “spying” upon you.  You may research past articles on electronic security that you can do, and this piece is a “refresher” that will enable you to secure yourself…. from your own equipment.

4 Ways to Block Cell Phone and Prevent Being Monitored

As mentioned in times past, Mylar can be your best ally.  Mylar is simple to use, affordable, and it works at blocking the signals going to and from your happy cell-phone tracking and recording device.  Here are some inexpensive sources for the Mylar:

  1. Chip/Snack bags: An infinite variety of sizes are available, and you will have to gauge what size you use after taking the size of your phone/device into account.
  2. Mylar in the form of “ponchos” or “space blankets”: these are a little more expensive than the chips, but only slightly so. You will end up with more Mylar to use, and the pieces you cut will not need to be cleaned off of salt and other detritus as with the chip bags.
  3. Freezer bags: Also in a variety of sizes, such as ones that hold up to 30 lbs. of food/ice (for a laptop-sized device) or just a small 1’ x 1’ bag, such as a lunchbag-cooler size.
  4. Another thing to do is to place your device inside of an ammo can (military issue). In doing so, make sure the rubber gasket around the mouth seals efficiently for a tight seal.  There are other containers that can be used; however, you may have to reinforce the seams with something such as Aluminum HVAC duct tape (available for about $15 per roll from your local Home Depot), and cover them over.  With the ammo cans, the container is contiguous with only the lid needing that rubber gasket that works.

How to Test for Protection

There is a way to test it out with your phone to see if you have the protection.  Take your chip bag or bags.  If they’re small, be advised that you will need about three complete layers around the cell phone.  Also, place your phone in a plastic Ziploc bag before putting them into the chip bags.  This will keep them clean just in case you missed wiping all of the stuff out of them.  Wiping out the bags can best be accomplished with a dry paper towel: the oils, salts, and other filth will be caught up by the towel.  Just remember to cover/swipe the entire inside surface of the bag.

Then turn your phone on, and turn up the volume of its ring all the way.  Next, roll/wrap up your phone and fold it over in at least three complete layers of Mylar.  Then use your house phone/landline/etc. to dial your wrapped-up cell phone’s number, and hold the wrapped-up phone close to your ear.

If you did the job correctly, you will not hear a thing.  Also, make sure you only ring it 3 times.  Any more than that and it may go to a voice-mail/other function, that will send it stored to your cell phone after you unwrap it as a missed call.  This way it will not ring it, and the call will have been cancelled.

Remember what General David Petraeus mentioned about the “Internet of things?”  Well, those days are upon us.  So, what else?  You’ll have to figure out the best method for making your layers work and last a long time.  You can take the chip bags, cut them open with scissors, and make three premeasured layers.  Form a pouch, and cover them inside and out with duct tape.  Then you just slip in your phone, and secure the top (fold it over) with whatever type of clamp or clip works for you.

The continuous signal your cell phone sends out (every 4 seconds) will be interrupted.  Inconvenient?  No.  Coordinate with your family members when you will call and talk to them beforehand.  Emergency?  Pull the phone out of the pouch and use it.


Bottom line: It is a discipline that will have to be followed to enable your privacy…from your own device.


99% of all people carry that thing around with them everywhere.  They’re hooked to it more closely than a fetus to the umbilicus: they can’t function without it.  But the point I’m making is this: Do you own the phone, or does it own you?

You can accomplish the same thing with your laptops and other “smart” toys…your palm-pilots, blackberries, cameras, and all of the other damnable devices that have made you an unwitting prisoner to the powers and systems that set them in place…not for your “technological convenience,” but for the very purposes of control, dominion, and surveillance over you.

Ammo cans work.  The Mylar (when cleaned and fashioned properly) will work.  Now you just received confirmation that it is happening, and I’ve given you methods to use to stop it from happening to you.  The methods work.  I have tested and used them myself.  So, without further ado, figure out how much material you need and make one of these pouches for yourself.  Your privacy is guaranteed under the 4th Amendment from illegal searches and seizures by the government.  That right, however, needs to be exercised by action.  So, finish those Doritos, clean out that bag, and wrap that phone up!  We’d love to hear of any tips or improvements you have come to trust.  Keep fighting that good fight, and send us your comments!  JJ out!


Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.


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Stockpiling Ammo for SHTF

by Brady

Once you have a firearm you need to consider what it is going to take to feed your weapon. You can think of it in the way of just getting enough ammo for a particular hunt or recreation, but I suggest you take a good hard look at stockpiling ammo for the just in case scenario. There are some good guidelines and tips on stockpiling ammo that will simplify this process for you and make it easier than it sounds on some forums you may have come across.

Stockpiling Ammunition: Amounts and Types

First we will go over the best amounts and types of ammunition to stockpile. This could be specific to the caliber and gauge of the firearms you so they may be somewhat generalized. The first type is the ultra popular 22LR. It is common and popular for good reason because it is light, effective, and generally cost efficient. The fact that you can generally get larger lots of this ammo for a fraction of the cost makes it an absolute staple in any ammo stockpile. Chances are you already own a 22LR and if you are new to firearms they are great way to get into shooting because of the lack of harsh noise and absence of recoil making it easy to get your fundamentals down. If you are able to master your shooting fundamentals with a gun that uses cheap ammunition you will be way ahead rather than trying to buy a gun to make you better. 22LR is now becoming a little easier to get a hold of in the 500 round lots again so it is a good time to go out and grab some. My recommendation for the amount to keep on hand is 2,000 rounds that you actually keep stockpiled away from your normal shooting stash. In the event you need to hunt for food this gives you a lot of opportunities with minimal space to store it and weight of the cache. This is only 4 cases of the 500 round “bricks” you typically see people buying.

For semiautomatic weapons such as your AR-15 and AR-10 platforms, as well as semiautomatic pistols it is a good idea to keep around 2,000 rounds as well because these types of rifles can really chew through your ammunition stock if you do a lot of shooting. It’s pretty much nothing to go out and shoot 100 rounds in an afternoon and that is just a little over 3 standard 30 round magazines. If you can keep stock of more than this it is even better but aiming for 2,000 rounds in reserve plus whatever amount you deem for practice shooting is a great goal to shoot for. It is the easiest and most affordable to buy FMJ (full metal jacket) ammunition because it is the most available and in the largest lots if you want to get bulk pack. A good goal is to have around 200 rounds of the more specialty type ammunition such as ballistic tip, hollow point, and match ammo because they are great for what they are designed for but are often over double the price of the conventional FMJ type ammunition.

For your bigger bolt guns and magnum rifles try to keep around 250 rounds in your reserve stash. The reason for this being a lower number is factored by two main reasons: cost and amount typically used. If you own a 300 win mag you know how expensive it is to shoot and the fact you don’t typically go out and try to shoot 100 rounds in a day unless your shoulder is made out of granite. However if you do a lot of long-range shooting you may go through more of this ammo so keep in mind the 250 rounds is just the amount of ammo you are saving for an emergency not included in your normal shooting ammo. For shotguns aim for about 500 rounds because regardless of gauge this is a lot of firepower. It might be a good idea to get a variety of loads besides just basic #7 bird-shot. 00 buckshot is great because of its effectiveness at self-protection and slugs for hunting.

Storage Solutions for your stockpiled ammo

Now that you have a better idea of how much ammunition to keep on hand I’ll go over the best ways to store it for long-term storage. First you will need some good containers such as plastic or metal ammo cans. These come with a gasket in the lid to make a strong seal when snapped shut making moisture and humidity difficult to permeate. I recommend leaving the ammunition in the boxes it comes in just for organizational sake to keep a bunch of loose rounds from rolling around. If you buy larger lots they sometimes come in an ammo can already so that will save you a step looking for a container. You can buy replacement gaskets so if a gasket ever starts to fall apart or dry up you can simply throw in a new gasket to keep the integrity of the ammo can. The best thing to do is keep desiccant packages inside the ammo can to absorb any moisture that would be inside the can keeping the rounds dry.  These are cheap and you can usually find them in things you already purchased in the packaging. Make sure to mark each box with what is inside either with some tape to write on or stencils so it is easy for you to identify if in a hurry.

Cost effective way to start stockpiling ammo

If you do not have the money to drop $350+ on a big lot of ammo you can simply go for a small box of ammo every week or couple of weeks. Just as an example say you will get a box of 20 rounds of .223/5.56 every week at around $9 a box for basic FMJ will add up to only $36 dollars a month and give you 1,200 rounds year. So basically you can incrementally add to your ammo stockpile instead of have to buy in bulk. It does offer some cost savings to purchase larger lots but may be a little easier to budget for a smaller weekly expense. As long as you take some simple steps to budget and prepare for it you will be able to begin getting a good cache built up.

 

 

6 Things To Do Before a Winter Storm Strikes

By 

Winter is here. Nights are longer, days are shorter and the temperature is dropping. It’s only a matter of time before a big winter storm strikes. Sure, you can cross your fingers and hope for the best. Good luck with that. If you’re not ready for a blizzard, you’ll have lots in common with Frosty the Snowman. Not a good situation for a human. Frosty’s already frozen, and someone thoughtfully gave him a hat and scarf.

Before you face a wintery blast, prepare. When icy gales howl, let Frosty be “jolly” and “happy” outside. You stay comfy and cozy inside the protection of your well-stocked home. Snowmen don’t drink hot cocoa anyway.

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9 Excellent Anti-Cancer Fruits To Include In Your Diet

By Dr. Adem Gunes

Fruits offer nutritional gains to the human body in the form of substances such as Vitamin C, phenols, fiber, folic acid, and antioxidants. It is a strongly established fact: plenty of evidence shows the anti-cancer properties of certain compounds in fruits.

Specifically, anti cancer fruits such as pineapple, apple, avocado, lemon, banana, grapes, and tomato have been found to be the most effective in preventing and eliminating cancer cells.

Cancer Fighting Foods

Many studies have supported the immense benefits of fruits against cancer. A review of 206 studies has concluded that a higher vegetable and fruit intake is associated with lower risks of cancer in the lungs, colon, stomach, pancreas, and oral cavity.

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How To Survive Extreme Cold Winter Without Prepping

source: thepreppejournal

I continue to see articles that offer good advice about prepping, But survive extreme cold winter is education, training, and skill. Barricading yourself in the home for defense or Bugging out! Yes, Fine. The more you have and can do works, but you and I have different meanings of the word. My transportation breaks down 40 miles from somewhere in snow/ice 20 degrees, and 30+ winds…. is a nice, but inconvenient adventure. I wish to tell a story, and make a “comedy media” about it. Not funny when you hear/see people die, but fantastic if you can learn for when you need it.

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How To Use Alternative Energy Sources for Your Home

By Laura Johnson

Yes, most of us depend on the local electric company for our energy needs. Not all of us even have the power to choose from differing rates like they do in cities like Dallas. Most of the time, especially in smaller areas, there is just the one power company and you either go with them or you don’t have power.

The thing is, traditional power companies aren’t the only way to get energy to our homes. What’s more, you don’t need to go off the grid to have these types of alternative energy sources in your home. Some of these types of energies include things like:

Why don’t we take a look at a few of these more closely?

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Eating Well Off Home Food Preservation – Lessons From History

Growing and storing foods is commonly a goal we strive for as we seek self-sufficiency. The easiest and fastest way to store foods is, of course, just dumping it into a root cellar or grain bin or barn, although not everything does so hot with that treatment. Hanging things like corn or onion braids from rafters or digging a pit to keep carrots or potatoes in is pretty close. We’ve been drying slivers and chunks of foods in the air for millennia now. All those methods of food preservation have transcended time pretty easily.

Some methods, however, have been lost along the way, or how we’ve done them has changed drastically – sometimes due to food safety understanding, but sometimes because our modern worlds make something else or another method far easier. Pressure canners and water bath canning aren’t exactly new, but they aren’t really historic methods, either. Folks needed other ways of getting from harvest to harvest once they stopped foraging as nomads, and for a long stretch of time, people were preserving meats, veggies, fruits and even eggs without electricity or refrigeration. Not every way I’ll point out was used extensively or often, nor do they all transfer to all climates or modern times, but some of them do.

Awesome DIY Projects that You’ve Never Heard of: Backyard Innovator -The Best Product That Offers You All Year Round Source Of Fresh Meat,Vegetables And Clean Drinking Water . Must Watch This FREE Video!

Methods for Food Preservation

Canning began during the Napoleonic Wars, but it wouldn’t catch on for home “bottling” for decades, even after tinned foods became more common as luxury items and expeditionary foods. Instead, people continued to depend on their old ways of food storage.

Some general non-canning, non-cellar methods of historic preservation are:

  • Dehydrating
  • Dry “salting” or salt packing
  • Dry “sugaring” or sugar packing (as opposed to sugar syrups)
  • Brining
  • Cold smoking
  • Fat-packing or confit, and
  • Fermenting

Some nations still rely hugely on foods that don’t require refrigeration,
but aren’t they aren’t limited to tinned/bottled meats or jerky.

Sometimes history buffs will say there are five types of historic preservation (Salting, Sugaring, Drying, Fermenting, Confit). Sometimes they say four. Sometimes they’ll count cold smoking meats as its own, sixth category. Sometimes they’ll add in the bairns and caches of foods buried into permafrost, or “normal” cold-storage cellars and buried urns. However we choose to number the “old” methods of preserving fruits, vegetables, and even meats, knowing they’re out there can give us some options. Once we have, there are things like sea biscuits, hard tack or pilot bread or sourdough breads and pemmican that we can learn to make as well to add increased variety and interest and long-term storage to our pantries, even without power or with a busted pressure canned weight.

Dehydration in many forms

A number of the listed methods rely on various aspects of dehydration to do the job of preservation. Drying fruit, vegetables and meat in an electric dehydrator, air, or solar dehydrator is the obvious one.


There are places with drying winds and low enough temperatures, like Alaska, where even large fish are simply split open and allowed to dry in the air. Some First Nations folk still dry their meat and fish that way, and Alton Brown used a couple of air filters and a fan to make jerky (works; I’m too OCD to rely on it). However, being able to enclose it in mesh or a cloth tent to limit insect and dust access, and being able to add smoke to the container or shed will result in a better cure. A salted and even spiced dip for meats or honey-sugar dip for fruits and thin pieces will help increase success.

Cold smoking – when we dig
a trench or use pipes between a fire and a tent or container to create something like dried fish, mammal jerkies, or dry sausages – also relies on slowly reducing the amount of moisture within our meats. Lowered moisture allows for longer storage.

People from Norway to Madagascar still air dry fish.

 

“Dry packing” or sugaring and salting meats, veggies and fruits also relies on dehydration. In both cases the dry ingredient is thickly layered and packed around cut meats and produce, usually in lidded ceramic pots and kegs in the gallon, half-bushel and bushel sizes. Liquids are leached out of the foods as they sit due to the desiccating nature, and the casks and lidded jars traditionally used regularly require topping off as a result. The salt or sugar and liquids end up slushy, like a gritty river in some cases, after just 4-6 weeks. Changing the salt and sugar out can buy months of storage, and keeping them in a fridge extends the life further, but for a basement or cellar in the 50-60 degree Fahrenheit range, it once regularly bought farmers 8-12 weeks.

Salting fish – Dry packing uses copious amounts of either sugar or salt to preserve foods, but offers an alternative to pressure canning, smoking and jerky.

It takes a lot of a couple of pretty precious resources to do so, however, and it always has. It was also, in the time before canners and jars were middle-class “normal”, one of the few ways colonists and Old World families had near-fresh consistencies with foods. For an alternative to drying meats into jerky especially, it may offer an alternative, especially if a pressure canner is going wonky or jars all have cracked threads and lips and are hard to replace.

Beyond Dehydration

Brining – which usually applies to fish and meats exclusively – does dehydrate meats a little bit, but the salty brine solution in which plates and filets, and sometimes quarters, are submerged really acts as a barrier between the surface of meats and the air, limiting what types of microbes can go to work on our foods, and the salt creates a pH level that inhibits anaerobic microbes as well. It’s similar to the way a sugar solution or pickling brine helps preserve cut fruit in modern water-bath canning. However, in this case, meat is soaked, a super-concentrated solution of salty water is prepared, sometimes with additional spices that aid in flavoring or extending preservation, and foods are submerged and kept in a cool place without heating.

Brining meats

 

Cold smoking applies to fat-covered hams and bacons, too – even when they’re produced from gooselegs – but the dehydration and smoke cure isn’t the main advantage there. It’s the layer of fat that carefully controls the aging (decomposition) process and allows for a storable product. The same holds true for confit meats and veggies like olives – the meat portion is submerged in a liquid fat. The fat itself keep microbes from decaying foods.

The fats in both mean that the storage time is limited by the fat used, since fats do go rancid. However, in the time before pressure canning, confit or fat-packed meats and fat-smeared, smoke-cured meats could add some welcome months, especially since slaughter traditionally took place when it was cool.

Fermentation

Fermentation is a unique way that people have preserved not only veggies but also fish for centuries – Africa, the Orient, Scandinavia, Western Europe, South Pacific Islands, pretty much everywhere. Salt is needed for the most common types of fermentation, but only in that it creates a condition where the correct microbes can transform sugars to lactic acid. Fermentation using a whey-based activator is actually the root of our “pickled” flavors, although pickling is now done far differently.

For image: Fermented foods go beyond sauerkraut, kimchi and hakarl and is a way to preserve foods using whey as an activator.

In addition to fish, there are traditional dairy products that use fermentation to create a product that stores without refrigeration, although the USDA kind of frowns on it now. Fermentation was also once very, very common as a daily repast – by producing grain beers that were high on calories and lower on alcohol. Beer and wine are great products to develop for the preparedness fold, but they do tend to take some specialized equipment or tools.

The Incredible Edible Egg

Pickled eggs are … okay as snack food, but I’d probably have a hard time convincing my loved ones and one of the dogs that it’s breakfast or dinner. Some of us may have tried whipping eggs, adding water, and spreading them in an Excalibur to dry. Many of us probably know the trick of coating clean eggs (even store-bought eggs) with a light layer of mineral oil and then keeping it in even a 60-65 degree basement for a while. It doesn’t take much oil to do a whole bunch of eggs, and they last upwards of a month or two, especially thick game bird eggs. Still, sometimes it’s interesting and informative to look at how past cultures have stored their eggs.

Preserve eggs with mineral oil.

Preserve eggs with mineral oil.

I’ve run across several that include more than just popping them into a cool basement or cellar in large flats. Clean but not washed eggs (the ones with bloom left on them) are good for even a couple weeks at 65-70 degrees as it is. Everything on the list below progressively adds a couple more weeks of edibility, sometimes a month or so, and was available as a method at least as far back as the Revolutionary War or to when Vikings were making landings. Burying them in casks somewhere cool but where they won’t go through repeated freeze-thaw cycle will add a couple more weeks to any method, and shorten the eggless days for the household.

  • Pack in dry salt – Shortest method, but best for flavor and multiple uses; it does dehydrate them and will change the texture over time
  • Store in wheat, rye, or oat chaff and bran – Will impart some earthy, musty, and beer-like flavors as time passes
  • Oil with rendered suet – Like coating with far cheaper mineral oil, but the ability to create suet isn’t a terrible skill to have; one of the longer-lasting methods, with excellent to okay eating and dog food at 2-3 months and still being about 50-50 human-versus-pig food at 6 months
  • Pack in hardwood ash – If you’re okay eating Revolutionary War ash cakes, it’s not bad, but the ash does start to come through in the flavor some after the first month; storage life is similar to melted suet and it does make use of a waste product, which is nice
  • Bottle in slake lime – Slake lime was a pretty common product made from limestone or oyster shell and water, but remember: this is the base process for “century” eggs or pidan, those green and brown fermented eggs. While the addition of other ingredients may account for some of the flavor, after 1-2 months, this is as different from a “baking” egg as kimchi is from cabbage.

Dried meat

Historic Food Preservation

Electricity for refrigeration, gas engines, and evolved livestock breeds didn’t just change how we ensure we can eat the same things year round. Some of the biggest advantages to learning the historic methods if we want to unplug as much as possible comes from our ability to store calcium, protein in hard, salted and pressed cheeses, various meats, and block suet.

Dried meat and fermented achara

Learning to make real salt pork and dry sausages can seriously increase a homesteader’s ability to deal with a whole or half steer or their thinned goat, sheep, goose, and pig herds to save feed for breeders come autumn and winter. While some of the methods require copious amounts of precious ingredients like sugar and salt or a fair bit of space, some of them can be used for the same holiday morale boosts they were once treasured for. There are other methods that were used by First Nations tribes, the Scandanavians, Far Eastern and other cultures throughout the world that we can now apply because research is as easy as tapping some keys.

Some other resources to check out regarding food storage include:

 

They’ll go into detail on some things that I skim, provide DIY plans, and give some charts for processing and smoking times, and they mention some other methods that I don’t really bring up, like water glassing eggs.

There is one aspect to be highly aware of: During the heyday of a lot of these preservation methods (and home canning) medical diagnoses included “consumption” and “wasting” even once it evolved past spirits and demonic possession. Looking back at history, we’re now laying a lot death and illness at the doorstep of fecal-oral route microbes, fungi, and other foodborne illnesses. Research the risks and methods, and prepare for supportive care and good hygiene, because those are likely to be major factors in surviving and thriving should we face a major calamity.

Once Upon a Time in America… Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800s for up to three years? Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now. Watch this video and you will find many interesting things!

 

By

 

OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

 

THE LOST WAYS (Pioneer Skills You May Need! Bonus: Learn The best 3 Pioneer Survival Lesson)

DARKEST WOMAN (Handpicked Tactics, Techniques And Even Quick-Fixes Tips)

US WATER REVOLUTION (Generate Your Clean Water Anywhere)

ALIVE AFTER THE FALL (Key Survival Situation Procedures and Knowledge for You and Me)

DROUGHT USA (Secure unlimited fresh clean water)

SURVIVE THE END DAYS (Exposes the biggest cover up of our president)

SURVIVAL MD (Learn how to survive any crisis situation)

BLACKOUT USA (EMP survival and preparedness guide)

CONQUERING THE COMING COLLAPSE (Financial advice and preparedness )

LIBERTY GENERATOR (Easy DIY to build your own off-grid free energy device)

BACKYARD LIBERTY (Easy and cheap DIY Aquaponic system to grow your organic and living food bank)

BULLET PROOF HOME (A Prepper’s Guide in Safeguarding a Home)

37 VITAL FOOD ITEMS You Can’t Get In The Coming Disaster And May Not Survive Without

 


This content may be freely reproduced in full or in part in digital form. Feel free to share any information from this site, leaving all links intact, giving credit to the author and including a link to www.survivalistnewsnetwork.com 


 

 

 

How to Survive With Just the Clothes on Your Back

Prepping by definition means taking proactive steps to get ready. We prepare for situations to happen. We prepare to have food for our family if the grocery stores are closed or sold out due to shortages or looting. We prepare to provide water for our family if the tap water is undrinkable due to pollution. We prepare for economic collapse by having precious metals and cash stored in places we can access even if the banks close. We prepare so we have what we need when we need it.

But some disasters catch you off guard. In this article we learn how to survive with just the clothes on your back. There are some cases where we don’t have our Bug Out bags with us at the moment. There are times when we don’t have our EDC gear because as much as we hate to admit it, sometimes we walk out the door unprepared. This could be for all manner of reasons and I want to stress that we should limit this type of oversight as much as possible, but it still happens. Survival isn’t only guaranteed to those who have the latest prepper gear. Your mindset will take you further than the coolest survival knife in the world and today we are going to talk about how to survive with only the real everyday items you have with you. When you roll out the door and go out for a walk, the stuff you’re wearing can still assist you. It could be the difference between life or death in a survival situation. Here’s how to make the most of what you’ve got when SHTF.

Watch

It’s important to stay connected and maintain access to valuable information. A smart watch like the Samsung Gear 2 can do just that. It can also guide you in the right direction when disaster strikes because it can give you access to GPS navigation.

 

Even if you don’t have a smartwatch, your regular watch can help you in the wild just as well. You can use your wristwatch as an orienteering device to find your way. Hold your watch horizontally and point its hour hand at the sun. Bisect the angle between its hour hand and the 12 o’clock mark to get the north to south line. If you are doubtfully determining which end of the line is actually north, remember, the sun rises in the east, sets in the west and is south at noon.

Shoelaces

The laces on your shoes can be used when you need rope or string. They also can be used to create a fire, a lifesaving essential in the wild. Using nothing but your shoelaces, sticks and some wood, you can start a fire with the bow-and-drill method. Use your lace to create the part of the bow that’s used to be tied around the drill. It will help keep everything in place while you’re sawing to create a hot fire.

 

Flashlight

Having a good tactical flashlight on your person can save you if you get lost in the woods, and it sure makes for a great signaling device. When SHTF you probably won’t be using your flashlight to signal for help, but you can use it in other ways.

Animals are typically scared away with a flash in the eyes from a flashlight. And in a disaster situation like a fire or earthquake, you can find your way out of a dark building. Choose a LED flashlight to add to your everyday carry. They are much better than the cheap incandescent ones and the battery life is much longer.

Belt

Your belt can come in handy when you’re braving the wilderness in more ways than one. Use your belt to bundle firewood, making it easier to carry from point A to point B. If you get injured, use it as a tourniquet. The small metal prong or buckle can be put to good use if you need a weapon or hook because it can be sharpened and molded.

Shirt

You need water to survive, but safe, drinkable water may be in short supply when the apocalypse hits. It’s not likely that your water purification system is part of your everyday carry, but your shirt can make a good substitute. Filtering water through fabric is actually more common around the world than you might think. Use your shirt or other piece of clothing (woven fabrics work the best) to remove the color and particles out of water. However, this will not eliminate viruses or illness, so always boil your water after filtering it.

So while I think we all can agree that nobody should be going for a hike into the wilderness without the proper preparation, sometimes you have to use what you have. I try to have my EDC with me every single place I go, but sometimes, my outfit choice doesn’t allow it. If I am in athletic attire, I don’t have my concealed firearm on my hip, my multi-tool and large flashlight. I don’t have a bandanna either just to name a few. I do have a source of fire and a light on my key-chain and my car, which is always near has a full selection of gear including my Get Home Bag.

Would you be able to sustain your loved ones when all hell brakes loose? In this video, I will unearth a long-forgotten secret that helped our ancestors survive famines, wars, economic crises, diseases, droughts, and anything else life threw at them… a secret that will help you do the same for your loved ones when America crumbles into the ground. I’m also going to share with you three old lessons that will ensure your children will be well fed when others are rummaging through garbage bins.Watch the video below to learn all about the 3 skills that will help you thrive in any crises situation:

 

Stepping out the door without the tools you count on is taking a risk, but we weigh those with the situation. Even if you have nothing but the clothes on your back, you can survive. As long as you keep your head.

 

source: theprepperjournal.com

 

OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

 

THE LOST WAYS (Pioneer Skills You May Need! Bonus: Learn The best 3 Pioneer Survival Lesson)

DARKEST WOMAN (Handpicked Tactics, Techniques And Even Quick-Fixes Tips)

US WATER REVOLUTION (Generate Your Clean Water Anywhere)

ALIVE AFTER THE FALL (Key Survival Situation Procedures and Knowledge for You and Me)

DROUGHT USA (Secure unlimited fresh clean water)

SURVIVE THE END DAYS (Exposes the biggest cover up of our president)

SURVIVAL MD (Learn how to survive any crisis situation)

BLACKOUT USA (EMP survival and preparedness guide)

CONQUERING THE COMING COLLAPSE (Financial advice and preparedness )

LIBERTY GENERATOR (Easy DIY to build your own off-grid free energy device)

BACKYARD LIBERTY (Easy and cheap DIY Aquaponic system to grow your organic and living food bank)

BULLET PROOF HOME (A Prepper’s Guide in Safeguarding a Home)

37 VITAL FOOD ITEMS You Can’t Get In The Coming Disaster And May Not Survive Without

 


This content may be freely reproduced in full or in part in digital form. Feel free to share any information from this site, leaving all links intact, giving credit to the author and including a link to www.survivalistnewsnetwork.com


 

 

 

Tubular Glass House Around A Tree

A Kazakh architect has plans to begin building this beautiful tubular glass house around a tree to support forest growth rather than destruction.

First designed in 2013, this tubular glass house provides a stunning response to the question, “What if we stopped cutting down trees and built houses around them?”

Of course, most people would assume that it would mean building houses between the trees and leaving nature undisturbed, but Aibek Almassov, a Kazakh architect, took it a step further.

When asked about why he decided to design the home, Almassov told Bored Panda,

“About two years ago I created the design of the house which was harmless and as close to the nature. I respect nature, it feeds us but we destroy it. I’ve been looking for a solution that would help in the future to avoid the destruction of forests, we want to live with it in harmony. So I created the tubular glass house around a tree.”

The house was originally designed years ago and was set to be built until an investor pulled out, leaving dreams of the glass house becoming a reality shattered.

However, a solar panel manufacturer recently showed interest in the project and the plans are back on. There is no exact date for when the house will be completed, but at least we have these stunning renderings to hold us over while we wait.

View the images below of this amazing house-to-be.

 

 

 

 

 

What do you think living in a house surrounding a tree would be like?

 

By Brianna Acuesta

 

OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

THE LOST WAYS (Pioneer Skills You May Need! Bonus: Learn The best 3 Pioneer Survival Lesson)

DARKEST WOMAN (Handpicked Tactics, Techniques And Even Quick-Fixes Tips)

US WATER REVOLUTION (Generate Your Clean Water Anywhere)

ALIVE AFTER THE FALL (Key Survival Situation Procedures and Knowledge for You and Me)

DROUGHT USA (Secure unlimited fresh clean water)

SURVIVE THE END DAYS (Exposes the biggest cover up of our president)

SURVIVAL MD (Learn how to survive any crisis situation)

BLACKOUT USA (EMP survival and preparedness guide)

CONQUERING THE COMING COLLAPSE (Financial advice and preparedness )

LIBERTY GENERATOR (Easy DIY to build your own off-grid free energy device)

BACKYARD LIBERTY (Easy and cheap DIY Aquaponic system to grow your organic and living food bank)

BULLET PROOF HOME (A Prepper’s Guide in Safeguarding a Home)

37 VITAL FOOD ITEMS You Can’t Get In The Coming Disaster And May Not Survive Without

 


This content may be freely reproduced in full or in part in digital form. Feel free to share any information from this site, leaving all links intact, giving credit to the author and including a link to www.survivalistnewsnetwork.com


 

 

 

Are You Prepared to Survive in the Wilderness Alone? “Natural Shelter, Blend In”

What would you do if circumstances forced you to survive in the wilderness alone, with little or no provisions?

Are you prepared to handle these scenarios? What if the SHTF and you must run?

These videos show how you can quickly build reliable shelter, even by yourself with no supplies or equipment.

Yes, they are crude, but with skill and preparation, they can withstand extreme weather and provide a base camp that will support survival in many situations. 

Continue Reading >>

WARNING: Pennsylvania Researchers Discover Glyphosate Herbicide in Honey and Soy Sauce

Researchers from Abraxis LLC and Boston University discover herbicide in honey and soy sauce. They have further confirmed that the world’s most used herbicide – glyphosate – is widespread in food products around the globe. The researchers tested honey, pancake and corn syrup, soy sauce, soy milk and tofu purchased in the Philadelphia, US metropolitan area.

Find the full published survey here.

Continue Reading >>

8 Nutrients That Boost Energy and Mood

Little things you do every day can add up and have a surprisingly big impact on your mental health.

Because a healthy cognitive system is essential to regulating mood, and certain nutrients have a profound impact on maintaining normal brain function, eating the right foods can improve your mood and energy levels.

Researchers have studied the association between foods and the brain and identified nutrients that boost energy can help combat depression and mood.

Continue Reading >>