Survivalist News Network

80% of Americans Living in Danger Zones

By Owen Sullivan

There are few things we take for granted more than our nation’s food supply.

Every single day, it ticks away in the background, unseen and unappreciated — a creaking behemoth of production and distribution.

Through these channels, millions of pounds of food are funneled silently to our supermarket shelves… only to be bought in a matters of days… and replaced so quickly you’d hardly notice they were gone in the first place.

But what if the supply suddenly stopped?

What if tomorrow morning, a city like Chicago — with a population of 2.7 million people — was cut off from all outside production?

How long would the food already in the city last?

The numbers don’t look good.

Sticking with supermarkets for a moment, the average store only keeps about three days’ worth of food on location at any one time.

This tight three-day window is just big enough to give stores ample supply to restock every night — but small enough to minimize storage and rotting.

However, this three-day estimation is 100% based on consumer activity during a regular shopping week. It doesn’t take into account how folks change their behavior in a crisis.

If there were a catastrophic event that stopped the production of food — be that an EMP that fried the national grid or an extreme global weather event that devastated our infrastructure — folks would know about it.

And the first thing they would do is stock up on as much food as they can.

The first day, there would be a frantic run on the stores. And between violent looting and legitimate sales, I doubt there would be anything left to sell on day two.

Now, depending on how much food you manage to grab… and how well you are able to ration… you might be able to make those supplies last for a couple of weeks.

But once that food is gone… there’s no more food coming… and there are 2.7 million people in the exact same boat as you.

Feeding the Beast

A city is a strange beast when you think about.

80% of all Americans live in danger zones, packed into high-rise buildings and cramped, narrow homes. We live on top of each under and under each other, trying to squeeze as many people into a few square miles as possible.

The idea is the more people in one place, the more opportunity. But the reality is… it leaves us all vulnerable.

Because “the beast” is so dense with people, it needs to consume an enormous amount of food… But with all the space taken up with offices and apartments blocks, there’s no room to actually produce any food.

So meat, produce, fish, and fast food are shipped in from the surrounding farmlands and factories across the country — and even imported from overseas.

But if you take away those supply lines… the beast starves… and it starves fast.

Experts estimate if our national grid were shut down — and the supply lines were severed — 90% of the entire country would die of starvation and disease in the first year.

Ninety percent of Americans dead in a single year. All because we’ve become too dependent on automation, machinery, and factories to feed our ballooning population.

Surviving in a Post-Collapse City

Trying to feed a city is a fool’s errand.

Ideally, everyone in city bounds would have a 90-day supply of food stockpiled to create a buffer of a few months to allow for lines of distribution to be re-established.

But you can’t expect other folks to be as well prepared as you are. And that makes a city one of the most dangerous places to be during a collapse.

Even if you have ample supplies and maybe even a method of producing your own food (more on that tomorrow), the vast majority of your 2.7 million neighbors do not. And in a post-collapse situation, they will do anything to get their hands on them.

At the end of the first week, things are going to start getting violent. And it’s only going to get worse from there. And I’m not just talking about roving gangs of violent youths here.

I’m talking about everyone. Starvation will make a perfectly normal person a heck of a lot more open to the idea of getting violent. They’ll do anything to survive and protect those they love. And they won’t care if that means hurting innocent people.

Living outside the city is a much more sensible option — especially if you can find a small town surrounded by farmland. That way you can’t be cut off from the food supply if the distribution channels go down.

If you have to live in the city because of work or relatives, I recommend being prepared to defend yourself and getting out of dodge at the first sign of trouble.

We’ll discuss this idea more tomorrow. And take a look at a single strategy for feeding your family and establishing strong financial footing in a post-collapse economy.

 


Decades Of Mismanagement Turned US Forests Into “Slow-motion Time Bombs”

By Michael Bastasch

  • Wildfire experts say poor management, not global warming, is the major reason behind worsening wildfires.
  • Forester Bob Zybach warned decades ago that environmental regulations and less logging would make fires worse.
  • The Trump administration is doing more active management of lands, but is it enough?

Bob Zybach feels like a broken record. Decades ago he warned government officials allowing Oregon’s forests to grow unchecked by proper management would result in catastrophic wildfires.

While some want to blame global warming for the uptick in catastrophic wildfires, Zybach said a change in forest management policies is the main reason Americans are seeing a return to more intense fires, particularly in the Pacific Northwest and California where millions of acres of protected forests stand.

“We knew exactly what would happen if we just walked away,” Zybach, an experienced forester with a PhD in environmental science, told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Zybach spent two decades as a reforestation contractor before heading to graduate school in the 1990s. Then the Clinton administration in 1994 introduced its plan to protect old growth trees and spotted owls by strictly limiting logging.

Less logging also meant government foresters weren’t doing as much active management of forests — thinnings, prescribed burns and other activities to reduce wildfire risk. (RELATED: Scientists Issue ‘Absurd’ Doomsday Prediction, Warn Of A ‘Hothouse Earth’)

Zybach told Evergreen magazine that year the Clinton administration’s plan for “naturally functioning ecosystems” free of human interference ignored history and would fuel “wildfires reminiscent of the Tillamook burn, the 1910 fires and the Yellowstone fire.”

Between 1952 and 1987, western Oregon only one major fire above 10,000 acres. The region’s relatively fire-free streak ended with the Silver Complex Fire of 1987 that burned more than 100,000 acres in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness area, torching rare plants and trees the federal government set aside to protect from human activities. The area has burned several more times since the 1980s.

“Mostly fuels were removed through logging, active management — which they stopped — and grazing,” Zybach said in an interview. “You take away logging, grazing and maintenance, and you get firebombs.”

Now, Oregonians are dealing with 13 wildfires engulfing 185,000 acres. California is battling nine fires scorching more than 577,000 acres, mostly in the northern forested parts of the state managed by federal agencies.

The Mendocino Complex Fire quickly spread to become the largest wildfire in California since the 1930s, engulfing more than 283,000 acres. The previous wildfire record was set by 2017’s Thomas Fire that scorched 281,893 acres in Southern California.

While bad fires still happen on state and private lands, most of the massive blazes happen on or around lands managed by the U.S. Forest Service and other federal agencies, Zybach said. Poor management has turned western forests into “slow-motion time bombs,” he said.

“If we can’t manage our forests, what the hell?” Zybach told TheDCNF.

Is It Global Warming?

The rash of massive fires has reignited the debate over how best to handle wildfires. Experts agree that a century of fire suppression caused forests to become overgrown and filled with dead wood and debris that easily ignites in dry summer heat.

However, there’s disagreement over whether or not global warming has exacerbated western wildfires. Some scientists, those often quoted in the news, link global warming to a longer wildfire season and more intense heat.

California Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown said bigger wildfires were part of a “new normal” because of global warming. People will just have to adapt to it, the governor said while touring the destruction left by the Carr Fire.

But attributing wildfires to man-made warming is trickier than many scientists let on given the myriad of factors that determine the intensity of fires.

“Global warming may contribute slightly, but the key factors are mismanaged forests, years of fire suppression, increased population, people living where they should not, invasive flammable species, and the fact that California has always had fire,” University of Washington climate scientist Cliff Mass told TheDCNF.

Mass also noted there hasn’t been much warming in the Pacific Northwest, adding that natural weather patterns in California prime the state for wildfires every year no matter what.

“Many of the media and some politicians has been pushing a false narrative: that the fires are mainly about global warming. They are not,” Mass said in an email. Mass also criticized politicians and the media for trying to make last year’s wildfire season about global warming.

Zybach also doesn’t buy that global warming is exacerbating fires. Through his research, Zybach analyzed thousands of official documents, reports and first-hand accounts of wildfire activity going back hundreds of years. His conclusion: wildfire season hasn’t changed much.

“To say there’s been another change, other than management, is just grasping at straws,” Zybach said.

What has changed is land management. For example, declines in timber production on federal lands, particularly in the Northwest, not only meant the death of a once vibrant industry, but also an end to thinning, controlled burns and other activities meant to keep forest growth in check.

Wildfire experts have also increasingly been pointing to the fact that more people and infrastructure are located in wildfire-prone areas than in the past, increasing the risk of wildfires impacting livelihoods.

A recent study found the number of homes at risk of wildfires in the western U.S. increased 1,000 percent since 1940, from about 607,000 in 1940 to 6.7 million. Since most fires are ignited by humans, the more people in fire-prone areas the higher the risk.

“This is a people problem,” said U.S. Geological Survey fire expert Jon Keeley. “What’s changing is not the fires themselves but the fact that we have more and more people at risk.”

Ticking Forest Fire Bombs

The Klondike Fire is one of several fires raging in southern Oregon, igniting more than 30,000 acres of protected forest and covering nearby towns with smoke and ash.

The nearby Taylor Fire has engulfed more than 41,000 acres, including protected woods. Officials are worried the two fires could combine.

The Klondike and Taylor fires are the fourth and fifth major blazes to burn through the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest since 1987 when the Silver Complex Fire burnt up more than 100,000 acres.

The Siskiyou National Forest encompasses 1.8 million acres in northern California through southwestern Oregon. The park also encompasses the Kalmiopsis Wilderness, which was created by Congress in 1964 to protect the rare plant life in the region.

However, before the Silver fire, you have to go back to the 1930s to find a comparable fire, according to Forest Service figures. Fires are labeled “complex” when two or more combine.

Oregon, like much of the western U.S., was ravaged by massive wildfires in the 1930s during the Dust Bowl drought. Megafires were largely contained due to logging and policies to actively manage forests, but there’s been an increasing trend since the 1980s of larger fires.

Active management of the forests and logging kept fires at bay for decades, but that largely ended in the 1980s over concerns too many old growth trees and the northern spotted owl. Lawsuits from environmental groups hamstrung logging and government planners cut back on thinning trees and road maintenance.

Zybach said Native Americans used controlled burns to manage the landscape in Oregon, Washington and northern California for thousands of years. Tribes would burn up to 1 million acres a year on the west coast to prime the land for hunting and grazing, Zybach’s research has shown.

“The Indians had lots of big fires, but they were controlled,” Zybach said. “It’s the lack of Indian burning, the lack of grazing” and other active management techniques that caused fires to become more destructive in the 19th and early 20th centuries before logging operations and forest management techniques got fires under control in the mid-20th Century.

What Will Trump Do?

In a recent tweet, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke blamed the “overload of dead and diseased timber in the forests makes the fires worse and more deadly.” the secretary called for more active management of forests to reduce fuel loads.

President Donald Trump signed legislation in March to prevent federal agencies from using forest management funding to pay for fire suppression, but that’s only a partial fix. Federal agencies need to be given more flexibility to clear forests of debris and lessen fuel loads.

The Forest Service planned to treat and clear more vegetation and harvest more timber than in 2017 to prevent fuel build-up. But that’s only happening on a fraction of the 193 million acres managed by federal foresters. Zybach said more needs to be done to get fuel loads down and reduce wildfire risks.

“It would make our forests safe and beautiful again and would create jobs,” Zybach said.

 


 

6 Things To Do Before a Winter Storm Strikes

By 

Winter is here. Nights are longer, days are shorter and the temperature is dropping. It’s only a matter of time before a big winter storm strikes. Sure, you can cross your fingers and hope for the best. Good luck with that. If you’re not ready for a blizzard, you’ll have lots in common with Frosty the Snowman. Not a good situation for a human. Frosty’s already frozen, and someone thoughtfully gave him a hat and scarf.

Before you face a wintery blast, prepare. When icy gales howl, let Frosty be “jolly” and “happy” outside. You stay comfy and cozy inside the protection of your well-stocked home. Snowmen don’t drink hot cocoa anyway.

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How To Survive Extreme Cold Winter Without Prepping

source: thepreppejournal

I continue to see articles that offer good advice about prepping, But survive extreme cold winter is education, training, and skill. Barricading yourself in the home for defense or Bugging out! Yes, Fine. The more you have and can do works, but you and I have different meanings of the word. My transportation breaks down 40 miles from somewhere in snow/ice 20 degrees, and 30+ winds…. is a nice, but inconvenient adventure. I wish to tell a story, and make a “comedy media” about it. Not funny when you hear/see people die, but fantastic if you can learn for when you need it.

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Natural Disaster Hotspot: Preparing For The Unexpected

by H. Davis

What is it that makes natural disasters so dangerous? Is it due the fact that it has the ability to destroy anything that stands in its way? Or does it have to deal with our inability of recognizing the signs of danger? Well, the answer is neither. The reason why a natural disaster is so dangerous is simply because we don’t prepare. A large percentage of the American population goes throughout their day-to-day lives without ever thinking of a natural disaster occurring.

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Top 20 Do’s and Don’ts in Your Condo During Earthquakes

With unpredictable natural disasters, do you wonder if your condo is a safe renting and living environment in the event of an earthquake? Fortunately, according to studies, taller buildings like most condos today are designed to be safer than low-rise structures during calamities and disasters. While this is great news for you, it’s no reason to be complacent. Increase your survival chances with these 20 dos and don’ts for surviving in your condo during earthquakes.

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14 Things You Must Do TODAY to Survive the Coming Economic Collapse

Yesterday, The Common Sense Show issued a breaking news alert as to the possible use of multiple IED type of devices based upon the reports of a highly credible source(s). The Common Sense Show is pleased to announce that arrests have been made in conjunction with this event and eventually I will be able to provide more details.

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